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Coins > Ancient Times > Roman Empire > Julio-Claudian Dynasty (27 v.Chr. – 68 n.Chr.)
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AUGUSTUS, 27 BC- 14 AD - AR Cistophoros, Pergamon or Ephesos (27-26 BC)

weight 11,54gr. ; silver Ø 24mm.

obv. Bare head of Augustus left, lituus before, IMP•CAESAR behind
rev. Six ears of corn tied together in bundle, deviding AVGV - STVS

This traditional denomination of the province of Asia, the cistophoros, with origins dating back to the time of the later Pergamene Kings, was minted extensively under Augustus. Production was more restricted under most of his successors and Claudius was the only other emperor amongst the Julio-Claudians to issue cistophori. There was a resumption of production from later Flavian times until Hadrian, the volume of whose Asian silver rivalled that of Augustus himself, but thereafter there was an abrupt cessation of minting. An isolated late revival came early in the 3rd century under Septimius Severus.

On Roman imperial coins we often see religious implements which were related to priests ; the simpulum (a ladle used in pouring liquids during sacrifices), the aspergillum (a sort of flail used to scatter water), a jug for pouring water or liquid offerings, and a lituus (a crooked staff of Etruscan-Italian origin used in Roman fortune-telling to ritually mark off sections of the sky). On this coin we see the lituus. It was used as a symbol of office for the college of the augurs to mark them out as a priestly group. Well, as often happens when there is an official state religion, that religion over time becomes a base of political power as well as the more spiritual type. By the late Republic, membership in the College of Pontiffs (the association of priests of the official Roman religion) was very useful to ambitious men, and so many were appointed priests despite having little interest in or talent for the religious life. These political priests would then leave the actual daily duties of the religion to a smaller crew of dedicated men (plus the women of the Vestal Virgins) while gaining the prestige of being publicly pious. Octavianus joined the College of Pontiffs in 47 BC, aged just 16, when his grand-uncle Julius Caesar was Pontifex Maximus (High Priest, head of the College). After Julius Caesar′s assassination, the office was taken over by Lepidus, who retained it (despite his eventual exile) until his death in 13 BC. At that point, Octavianus, by now called Augustus, became the new Pontifex Maximus, and the title was then passed down to subsequent emperors who often had even less claim to it (at least based on interest in, or aptitude for, religious observances). The title "Pontifex Maximus" was used even by the early Christian emperors, up to Gratianus (375-383 AD) despite their opposition to the official pagan gods of the Roman religion. It was finally dropped as an Imperial title by Gratianus, though it has sometimes been used since the Renaissance to describe the Roman Catholic Pope. In fact the use of the lituus continued as crosier of catholic bishops.

Cohen- (cf. 32 = hear to right) ; RIC 491 (R3) ; BMC 700 ; RPC.2206 RRR
Wonderful coin of devine style and attractive toning. Extremely rare.
vf+

4.350,00 



AUGUSTUS, 27 BC- 14 AD - AR Cistophoros, Pergamon or Ephesos (27-26 BC)

weight 11,81gr. ; silver Ø 24,5mm.

obv. Bare head of Augustus right, lituus before, IMP•CAESAR behind
rev. Six ears of corn tied together in bundle, deviding AVGV - STVS

This traditional denomination of the province of Asia, the cistophoros, with origins dating back to the time of the later Pergamene Kings, was minted extensively under Augustus. Production was more restricted under most of his successors and Claudius was the only other emperor amongst the Julio-Claudians to issue cistophori. There was a resumption of production from later Flavian times until Hadrian, the volume of whose Asian silver rivalled that of Augustus himself, but thereafter there was an abrupt cessation of minting. An isolated late revival came early in the 3rd century under Septimius Severus.

Cohen 32 ; RIC 490 (R2) ; RPC.2209 RR
(cf. NAC Auction 125, lot 592 in xf ; SFR 12.000 + 23%)
vf-/vf

2.350,00 



AUGUSTUS, 27 BC - 14 AD - AR Cistophoros, Ephesos (24-20 BC)

weight 11,68gr. ; silver Ø 25mm.

obv. Bare head of Augustus right IMP • CAESAR
rev. Garlanded altar of Diana (Artemis) with bas-reliefs
of two confronted hinds, AVGVSTVS

Cohen 33 ; RIC 482 ; BMC 694 ; RPC.2215 ; Sear 1587 R
Very attractive portrait of good style. Rare.
vf/xf à vf+

1.495,00 



AUGUSTUS, 27 BC-14 AD - AV Aureus, Lugdunum (2-1 BC)

weight 7,94gr. ; gold Ø 20mm.

obv. Laureate head of Augustus right, surrounded by the legend;
CAESAR AVGVSTVS DIVI F PATER PATRIAE
rev. Caius and Lucius Caesars standing facing, each togate and resting hand 
on shield; behind each shield a spear, above simpulum (on left, turded inwards) 
and lituus (on right, tuned inwards), surrounded by the legend;
C L CAESARES AVGVSTI F COS DESIG PRINC IVVENT

This coin type is not, as stated in RIC², date as 2 BC - 4 AD, but these coins
were struck in 2 - 1 BC , which stems from the fact that Gaius Caesar in 1 AD.
acquired the consulship and thus no longer bore the title of Princepes Iuventutis.

Caius Julius Caesar (20 BC – 21 February AD 4) was consul in AD 1 and the grandson of Augustus, the first emperor of the Roman Empire. Although he was born to Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa and Julia the Elder, Augustus′ only daughter, Caius and his younger brother, Lucius Caesar were raised by their grandfather as his adopted sons and joint-heirs to the empire. He would experience an accelerated political career befitting a member of the Julio-Claudian dynasty, with the Roman Senate allowing him to advance his career without first holding a questorship or praetorship, offices that ordinary senators were required to hold as part of the cursus honorum. In 1 BC Caius was given command of the eastern provinces, after which he concluded a peace treaty with King Phraates V of Parthia on an island in the Euphrates. Shortly afterward, he was appointed to the office of consul the following year in AD 1. The year after Caius′ consulship, Lucius died at Massilia in the month of August. Approximately eighteen months later, Caius died of an illness in Lycia. Although he married his second cousin Livilla prior to his death, they did not have children. Following the deaths of Caius and Lucius, Augustus adopted his stepson as well as his sole-surviving grandson – Tiberius and Agrippa Postumus, respectively – in AD 4.

Cohen 42 ; RIC 206 (R2) ; BMC 513 ; Sear 1578 ;
Bahrfelt 235 ; Calicó 176
R
Very attractive piece with some lustre, struck on a broad flan.
Unusual nice for the type. Rare.
xf-

14.950,00 



AUGUSTUS, 27 BC - 14 AD - AR Denarius, probably Colonia Caesaraugusta (19-18 BC)

weight 3,86gr. ; silver Ø 17mm.

obv. Head of Augustus with oak-wreath (civic crown) right
rev. Two upright laurel branches or laurel trees side by side,
CAESAR above, AVGVSTVS below

The laurel-trees are those which were planted by order
of the Senate on either side of the house of Augustus.

The laurel trees, the corona civica and the clypeus virtutis were modest and simple honors in the old Roman tradition. Laurel wreaths and branches had always crowned victors and were the attribute of Victory herself, but the laurel is also Apollo′s tree. The positioning of the two laurel trees on either side on the entrance to Augustus′s house will have had a special association for the contemporary viewer. Since Archaic times such pairs of trees had flanked the headquarters of the oldest priesthoods, at the Regia, the Temple of Vesta, and the seat of the flamines and pontifices. Thus the laurel trees conferred on the entry to Augustus′s house a sacred aura and invoked the powers of primordial religion.

On this coin Augustus is depicted with the Corona Civica (civic crown). The Corona Civica was originally a military honour bestowed upon a Roman who had saved a fellow citizen′s life in battle. It was one of the greatest public honours. It harkens back to the declarations of gratitude conferred on Augustus in 27 BC, when the senate awarded him the corona civica (civic wreath or crown) and the clipeus virtutis (shield of valour). In the imperial era the honour developed from a coveted military decoration into an imperial emblem granted by the Senate to the emperor. The wreath was made of oak leaves and is sometimes called a corona quercea after the common name for the oak. Plutarch believed the oak was chosen for this highest of honours for several reasons. The tree was easily found throughout the coun-tryside and was quite convenient for fashioning a wreath when the need arose. Also, the oak is sacred to Jupiter and Juno and thus was an appropriate symbolic honour given to one who has saved the life of a fellow Roman citizen. Finally, the early settlers of  Rome, the Arcadians, were  nicknamed ′acorn-eaters′ in an oracle of Apollo.

Cohen 47 ; RIC 33a ; cf. BMC 352 ; Sear- RR
(cf. NAC auction 125 , lot 600 in xf+ ; SFR 17.000  + 23%)
Wonderful coin of fine style and with excellent details.
xf/unc

8.750,00 



AUGUSTUS, 27 BC-14 AD - AR Denarius, Lugdunum (15-13 BC)

weight 3,78gr. ; silver Ø 19mm.

obv. Bare head right  AVGVSTVS DIVI F
rev. Apollo Citharoedus, in long drapery, standing left, holding plectrum 
in right hand and lyre in left, IMP to left, X to right, ACT in exergue

In commemoration of the victory over Antony and Cleopatra
at the battle of Actium on 2 September 31 BC.

This reverse type is part of the great series of coins struck in recognition and celebration of the great victory won at the Battle of Actium, on 2 September 31 BC, over the combined naval forces of  Marcus Antonius and Cleopatra. The magnitude and importance of this overwhelming military victory cannot be understated and is reflected in the great commemorative works undertaken by Augustus, then Octavianus. Apollo Actius is here honoured on account of the fact that on the nearby promontory overlooking the sea stood an ancient Arkadian temple dedicated to Apollo, whose divine patronage we should be in no doubt would have been sought before the battle, and this was seemingly granted and manifested in the utter destruction of the Antonian-Ptolemaic fleet. The old temple of Apollo was enlarged and renovated by Augustus. Probably this action was intended to underline Augustus′ piety and his gratitude to his  patron  god, and perhaps to try to win over the local population which was not particularly friends to Caesar′s heir.

Cohen 144 ; RIC 171a ; BMC 461 ; Sear 1611
Very minor weakness, but very attractive coin of good style
and with wonderful portrait .
xf-

1.395,00 



AUGUSTUS, 27 B.C - 14 A.D. - AR Denarius, Lugdunum (11-10 B.C.)

weight 3,76gr. ; silver Ø 18mm.

obv. Bare head right, AVGVSTVS behind, DIVI F before
rev. Bull butting left, IMP  XII in exergue

More personal to Augustus himself is the theory that what we see here is a reference to the famous ′butting bull′ type seen on the coinage of Thurium. Born Caius Octavius Thurinus in celebration of his father′s victory in battle against a Spartacist army, which took place outside the town, this reverse type would be a personal allegory to Augustus and the high regard in which his family was held by the townspeople of Thurium.

Cohen 158 ; RIC 178a ; BMC 476 ; cf. Sear 1610 RR
Small bankersmark on the obverse. Wonderful coin with fine details.
xf-

1.450,00 



AUGUSTUS, 27 BC-14 AD - AR Cistophoros, Pergamon (19-18 BC)

weight 11,82gr. ; silver Ø 26mm.

obv. Bare head of Augustus right,
below  IMP•IX•TR•PO•V
rev. Single-span triumphal arch surmounted by large statue of Augustus
in facing triumphal quadriga. In the opening of the arch legend in three
lines; S•P•R / SIGNIS / RECEPTIS, on architrave the legend; •IMP•IX•TR•POT•V•

The traditional denomination of the province of Asia, with its origins dating back to the time of the later Pergamene kings, the cistophorus, was minted extensively under Augustus. The cistophoric tetradrachm had the value of 3 denarii. Production was more restricted under most successors and Claudius was the only other emperor amongst the Julio-Claudians to issue cistophorii. There was a resumption of production from later Flavian times until Hadrian, the volume of whose Asian silver rivalled that of Augustus himself, but thereafter there was an abrupt cessation of minting. An isolated late revival came early in the 3rd century under Septimius Severus.

The reverse of this cistophorus commemorates the standards taken back by the Senate and Roman People. After the military victory of Augustus′ armies over the Parthians, in 20 BC Phraates, the king of Parthia, returned the standards which the Romans had lost at the battle of Carrhae in 53 BC and on other occasions. To celebrate this event a triumphal arch was built in Rome, which we can see on this coin. At the end of his long reign, Augustus was said to have remembered the recovery of the standards lost to the Parthians by Marcus Crassus, as his proudest achievement.

Exceptional portrait style, much nicer than the typical boyish portrait
that appears on this type. Rare and a very attractive historical coin.
Cohen 298 ; RIC 510 ; BMC 703 (=BMCRR East 310) ;
CBN.982 ; RPC.2218 ; Sear 1590
R
(cf. Triton XX, lot 640 in vf+ : USD 4000 + 20%)
vf+/vf

2.650,00 



AUGUSTUS, 27 BC-14 AD - AV Aureus, Lugdunum (13-14 AD)

weight 7,74gr. ; gold Ø 19mm.

obv. Laureate head of Augustus right, surrounded by the legend;
CAESAR AVGVSTVS DIVI F PATER PATRIAE
rev. Tiberius as Caesar, standing right, driving triumphal quadriga,
holding eagle tipped scepter in left hand and laurel branch and reins in right;
the horses′ heads all face right, surrounded the the legend;
TI CAESAR AVG F TR POT XV

Nearing the end of his life, the great Augustus must have felt betrayed by the gods, as all six of his potential heirs had expired or proved incapable of succeeding him. Though his only remaining grandson, Agrippa Postumus, theoretically could have been recalled from exile, it did not happen, and the great Augustus was succeeded by his dour stepson Tiberius. This aureus, struck in the last months of Augustus′ life, seems a clear indication that Rome′s first emperor had conceded - however reluctantly - to Tiberius′ succession. The obverse bears the portrait of Augustus, just as one would expect, but the reverse is dedicated entirely to Tiberius, who is shown in a four-horse chariot celebrating the 15th renewal of his tribunician power (July 13 AD). It commemorates Tiberius′ victory over the Dalmatian and Pannonian tribes. Never terribly imaginative with his precious metal coinage, Tiberius retained this quadriga scene as his aureus and denarius reverse type for the first three years of his reign (see Tiberius, RIC 1-4). When he eventually replaced the quadriga type, he did so with another late Augustan type depicting his mother Livia in the guise of Pax. Very rare historical coin.

Cohen 299 ; RIC 221 (R2) ; Lyon 89 ; BMC 511 ;
BN 1685-6 ; Calicó 294 ; Sear-
RR
(cf. NAC 117, lot 257 in vf/xf ; SFR 19.000 + 18%)
Some very tiny edge nicks and marks, but overall
very attractive and well-centred aureus of good style.
vf/xf

17.500,00 



AUGUSTUS, 27 BC - 14 AD - AR Quinarius, Emerita (25-23 BC)

weight 1,77gr. ; silver Ø 14mm. 

obv. Bare head of Augustus right  AVGVST 
rev. Victory standing right, crowning trophee  P CARISI LEG

The colony of Emerita Augusta (modern Mérida in Spain), was founded in 25 BC by
P.Carisius, governor of Lusitania. It was meant for veterans of legions V Alauda and
X Gemina, who had recently participated in Augustus’ campaigns in north-western Spain.

Cohen 386 ; RIC 1a ; BMCRE 293
vf/vf+

295,00 



AUGUSTUS, 27 BC-14 AD - LUCIUS AQUILLIUS FLORUS, triumvir monetalis - AR Denarius, Rome (18 BC)

weight 3,68gr. ; silver Ø 20mm.

obv. Bare head right  CAESAR AVGVSTVS
rev. Warrior (Manius Aquillius) with shield standing facing,
head right, raising half-prostrate female (Sicilia)
L•AQVILLIVS•FLORVS III VIR, SICIL in exergue

This rare type, by the moneyer Lucius Aquillius Florus, likely relates to the achievements of his deceased relative Manius Aquillius Florus served as Consul of Rome with Caius Marius in 101 BC. Before his consulship, during the Cimbrian War, he had served as a legate under Marius in Gaul. He played a pivotal role during the Battle of Aquae Sextiae where he surprised the Teutones by attacking them from behind. As consul he crushed a slave revolt in Sicily in the Second Servile War (104-100 BC). In 101 BC, the Roman Manius Aquillius was given the command against the insurgents in Sicily. He succeeded in defeating Athenion′s slave army upon arrival. He supposedly killed Athenion by his own hand. The revolt was quelled, and 1.000 slaves who surrendered were sent to fight against beasts in the arena back at Rome for the amusement of the populace. To spite the Romans, they refused to fight and killed each other quietly with their swords, until the last flung himself on his own blade. It was the second of a series of three slave revolts in the Roman Republic, but fueled by the same slave abuse in Sicily and Southern Italy.

The gens Aquillia or Aquilia was a plebeian family of great antiquity at ancient Rome. Two of the Aquillii are mentioned among the Roman nobles who conspired to bring back the Tarquins, and a member of the house, Gaius Aquillius Tuscus, was consul in 487 BC. The nomen Aquilius or Aquillius is probably derived from aquila, an eagle. On coins and inscriptions the name is almost always written Aquillius, but in manuscripts generally with a single l. The oldest branch of the family bore the cognomen Tuscus, suggesting that the gens may have been of Etruscan origin, although the nomen of the gens is indisputably Latin, and the name Tuscus could have been acquired in other ways. This cognomen is nonetheless dubious as only found in late sources; Robert Broughton mentions that it could have also been Sabinus. From the imagery of their coins, it seems that the Aquillii had a special devotion for Sol, a rare occurrence under the Republic. The Aquillii Flori first appear during the First Punic War, although they must have existed since the fourth century BC, and flourished at least until the time of Augustus. Their name simply means ″flower″.

Cohen 366 ; RIC 310 ; BMC 50 ; Sear- RR
(cf. Numismatic Ars Classica, auction 86, lot 64 xf: CHF 7.500 + 19%)
A lovely portrait and a wonderful old cabinet tone.
Very attractive historical coin of good style and fine details. Very rare.
xf-

3.650,00 



AUGUSTUS, 27 BC-14 AD - PUBLIUS CARISIUS, legatus and propreator - AR Denarius, Emerita (25-23 BC)

weight 3,83gr. ; silver Ø 20mm.

obv. Bare head of Augustus right, IMP CAESAR before,
AVGVSTVS behind
rev. Trophy of Celtiberian arms, consisting of helmet, cuirass, shield,
and javelins, erected on heap of round shields, lances, and other arms,  
P CARISIVS on left,  LEG  PRO  PR on right

The gens Carisia was a Roman family during the latter half of the 1st century BC. This coin was minted in Emerita Augusta (modern Mérida) by Publius Carisius as as legatus and propraetor. The colony of Emerita was founded in 25 BC by Publius Carisius, governor of Lusitania. It was meant as colony for veterans of legions V Alauda and X Gemina, who had recently participated in Augustus′ campaigns in north-western Spain under command of Publius Carisius. They were deployed along a front 400 kilometers wide, stretching from the modern Basque province of Guipuzcoa to northern Portugal. By contrast, the north-western tribes were able to muster about 100.000 men, mainly concentrated in their many hilltop settlements (castros) scattered across the rugged landscape. They were therefore more effective in conducting guerilla warfare against the Romans than attempting pitched battles. In 26-25 Augustus started a campaigning in three different areas. The settlements of Aracillum (modern Aradillos), Bergidum (modern Villafranca del Vierzo) and Lucus (modern Lugo) soon were captured and the defenders were killed or managed to flee. Publius Carisius managed to capture the stronghold at Lancia (modern Villasbariego). As far as Augustus was concerned, the north-west was now pacified, and he left Hispania in 24 BC to celebrate a triumph at Rome. This coin commemorates the success of these  campaigns. In reality the situation was still unstable. In 22 BC Publius Carisius was still in command of the army of Ulterior and succeeded in securing some of the main gold-mining areas by advancing northwards through the Pajares and Manzanal passes. The threat of continued Roman expension in the north-west coupled with Carisius′ brutality sparked off another revolt amongst the tribe of the Cantabri. Publius succeeded to put down this revolt, with the timely assistance of Caius Furnius. In 19 BC resentment against the Romans ran high and boiled over into a major rebellion. This was, in fact, the last serious resistance to Roman authority in the nort-west of Hispania.

Cohen 403 ; RIC 5 ; BMC 286 ; cf. Sear 1628 R
Rare historical coin with attractive toning
vf/vf+

1.150,00 



AUGUSTUS, 27 BC-14 AD - CAIUS GALLIUS, CAIUS FILIUS LUPERCUS, triumvir monetalis - AE Sestertius, Rome (16 BC)

weight 20,83gr. ; orichalcum Ø 34mm.

obv. CIVIS within oak-wreath, flanked by two laurel-branches,
OB above, SERVATOS below
translated; ′for saving the citizens′
rev. Large S C, surrounded by the legend;
C•GALLIVS•C•F•LVPERCVS•III•VIR•A•A•A•F•F
translated; Caius Gallus Caii Filius Lupercus, Triumvir Auro, Argento, Aere, Flando, Feriundo. Senatus Consultum = Caius Gallus son of Caius Lupercus, moneyer (Triumvir Monetalis) for the casting and striking of gold, silver, and bronze coins. Decree of the senate.

The gens Gallia was a plebeian family at ancient Rome. Several members of this gens are mentioned during the first century BC. The family of Caius Gallius had produced several senators since 73 BC before his was appointed triumvir monetalis in 16 BC. Nothing is known about his career before and after the vigintivirat.

On the reverse of this coin the Corona Civica (civic crown) is depicted. The Corona Civica was originally a military honour bestowed upon a Roman who had saved a fellow citizens life in battle. It was one of the greatest public honours. It harkens back to the declarations of gratitude conferred on Augustus in 27 BC, when the senate awarded him the corona civica (civic wreath or crown) and the clipeus virtutis (shield of valour). In the imperial era the honour developed from a coveted military decoration into an imperial emblem granted by the Senate to the emperor. The wreath was made of oak leaves and is sometimes called a corona quercea after the common name for the oak. Plutarch believed the oak was chosen for this highest of honours for several reasons. The tree was easily found throughout the coun-tryside and was quite convenient for fashioning a wreath when the need arose. Also, the oak is sacred to Jupiter and Juno and thus was an appropriate symbolic honour given to one who has saved the life of a fellow Roman citizen. Finally, the early settlers of  Rome, the Arcadians, were  nicknamed acorn-eaters in an oracle of Apollo.

Cohen 434 ; RIC 377 ; BMC 171 ; Sear 1646 S
struck on a short flan
f/vf

295,00 



AUGUSTUS, 27 BC-14 AD - AE Sestertius, Rome (15 BC)

weight 25,33gr. ; orichalcum Ø 35mm.
Minted in the name of moneyer L. Naevius Surdinus

obv. CIVIS within oak-wreath, flanked by two laurel-branches,
OB above, SERVATOS below
rev. L•NAEVIVS•SVRDINVS•III•VIR•AA•AF•F• around large S•C

The legend OB CIVIS SERVATOS ″for having saved the citizens″ refers to Corona Civica, a civic crown of oak-leaf. It was a simple honor, in the Roman tradition, awarded for rescuing a comrade in battle and was placed over the door of the awarded citizen. This honor is rooted in military tradition. The senate awarded it to Octavian ″ob cives servatos″, for rescuing all his fellow citizens. Additionally, oak is associated with Jupiter.

Cohen 471 ; RIC 383 ; BMC 139 ; Sear 1650
vf-/vf

685,00 



AUGUSTUS, 27 BC-14 AD - QUINTUS RUSTIUS, triumvir monetalis - AR Denarius, Rome (19-18 BC)

weight 4,03gr. ; silver Ø 18mm.

obv. Jugate, draped busts right of Fortuna Victrix, wearing round helmet,
holding patera, and of Fortuna Felix, diademed, set on bar with ram′s
head finials, surrounded by the legend; Q•RVSTIVS FORTVNÆ above,
ANTIAT below
translation; Quintus Rustius, Fortunae, Antiatum
(= Quintus Rustius, of Fortunae, at Antium)
rev. Ornamented rectangular altar ′Ara Fortunae Reducis′ 
inscribed FOR•RE, surrounded by the legend;
CAESARI AVGVSTO, EX S•C below
translation; Caesari Augusto, Ex Senatus Consultum. Fortuna Redux
(= of Caesar Augustus, by decree of the senate. to Fortune,
who [safely] returns [travelers])

The gens Rustia was a minor plebeian family at ancient Rome. Members of this gens are first mentioned toward the end of the Republic, and a few of them achieved prominence in imperial times, with Titus Rustius Nummius Gallus attaining the consulship under Tiberius in 34 AD. Quintus Rustius was apponted triumvir monetalis in 19 BC. He was also one of the duumvirs (or duoviri) at Antium, as this coin also tells us. This duo of magistrates were expected to deal with public finance of a city, deal with proceedings in the Ordo decurionum, the town council, and run the elections in the comitium or assembly. The office was determined by election and lasted one year. Antium (modern Anzio, 50 km. south of Rome) was the capital of the Volsci people until it was conquered by the Romans. In some versions of Rome′s foundation myth, Antium was founded by Anteias, son of Odysseus. In 468 BC Antium was captured by the Roman consul Titus Quinctius Capitolinus Barbatus following a war started by the Volsci, and a Roman colony was planted there the next year.

The cult of Fortuna Redux was a form of the goddess Fortuna in the Roman Empire who oversaw a return, as from a long or perilous journey. It was introduced to Roman religion in 19 BC, creating a new holiday (feriae) on October 12 that originally marked the return of Augustus to Rome from Syria and Asia Minor in 19 BC. From that time, she received annual sacrifices from the pontiffs and Vestals at an altar dedicated to her (Ara Fortunae Reducis). This altar is depicted on this coin.  The altar of Fortuna Redux was inaugurated on 12 October 19 BC, and dedicated on 15 December. It was probably adjacent to the Temple of Honor and Virtue near the Porta Capena. The temple most likely stood on the slope of the Capitoline Hill overlooking the Porta Triumphalis.

Cohen 513 ; RIC 322 (R2) ; BMC 2 ; Sear 1605 R
Wonderful coin with attractive tone. Rare.
xf-

1.450,00 



AUGUSTUS, 27 BC-14 AD - AR Denarius, Rome (17 BC)

weight 3,66gr. ; silver Ø 18mm.

obv. Bare head of Augustus right, surrounded by the legend;
AVGVSTVS DIVI F
rev. Youthful laurated head of Genius Saeculari Nivo right,
with features resembling Augustus, four-rayed comet with tail above,
surrounded by the legend; M.SANQVINIVS.III.VIR

struck in name of the monetarius M.Sanquinius

This cointype is in commemoration of the Ludi Saeculares, the Secular Games celebrated by Augustus in 17 B.C. to mark the commencement of a "New Age" inaugurated by the Divine Julius and now brought to fruition by his heir. The youthful head on the reverse has usually been interpreted as that of a rejuvenated Caesar, on the evidence of the comet "Sidus Iulium" which surmounts the portrait. However, there is clearly no resemblance to the late dictator and it seems more satisfactory to regard it as a personification of the "New Age" itself, endowed, like so many of the divine images of the Augustus reign, with the features of the emperor (cf.A.A. Boyce in ANS.NNM.153, pp.1-11). Very rare.

Sr. 1621 ; Cohen 1 (Julius caesar and Augustus) ; RIC 338 ;
BMC 71 ; BMCRR.4585
RR
Small bankermarks end light graffiti, attractive patina.
vf

1.850,00 



AUGUSTUS, 27 BC - 14 AD - AE Sestertius, Rome (80)

weight 23,32gr. ; bronze Ø 34mm.

obv. Augustus, radiated, seated left, holding branch and scepter,
altar at feet  DIVVS AVGVSTVS PATER
rev. Large S C, REST above, around the legend
IMP T CAES DIVI VESP F AVG PM TR PPP COS VIII 

Orginally this coin type was struck  in 22/23 AD during the reign of Tiberius, in honour of the deceased Augustus. The obverse may represent the statue of Divus Augustus set up near the Theatre of Marcellus in Rome. During the reign of Titus, a whole range of Julio-Claudian aes types from Divus Augustus to Claudius were restored, including this sestertius type. Quite a rare type as a restoration issue under Titus rather than Tiberius. An exceptional piece of great quality and rarity.

Cohen 548 ; RIC 184 ; BMC 261 ; Sear 2579 R
very attractive coin with brown patina
vf/xf

2.950,00 



AUGUSTUS, 27 B.C. - 14 A.D. - AE Sestertius, Rome (96)

weight 22,53gr. ; orichalcum Ø 33mm.
struck during the reign of Nerva (96-98 A.D.)

obv. Laurated head right, around the text;  DIVVS AVGVSTVS
rev. IMP NERVA CAESAR AVGVSTVS REST around S C

Cohen 570 ; RIC 136 ; BMC 149 R
vf-/vf

1.095,00 



AUGUSTUS, 27 BC - 14 AD - HISPANIA, EMERITA - AE 28 or As (14-37)

weight 15,56gr. ; bronze Ø 28mm.

obv. Radiate head of Augustus left  DIVVS•AVG•PATER•C•A•E•
rev. Large altar with double panelled door and horns above
PROVIDENT PERMI AVG

Minted in honour of the deceased Augustus, during the reign of his son Tiberius.

The site of the altar dedicated to the ′Providence′ of Augustus is not known, but it may have been located in the Campus Martius, a puplicly owned area of Rome. During the Augustan period of the early Roman Empire, the area became officially part of the city: Rome was split into 14 regions, and the Campus Martius was divided into the VII Via Lata on the east and the IX Circus Flaminius nearer to the river. The Campus Martius also held the Ara Pacis (Altar of Peace), built by the Senate to mark the establishment of peace by Augustus.

The Colonia Augusta Emerita was founded in about 25 BC
with veterans from the 10th and 5th
legions.

Guádan 1002-1003 ; O.Gil Farres 118-120 ; Vives 143-147 ; 
SNG.Copenhagen 408 ; RPC.34
Very attractive coin with dark patina.
vf+

335,00 



AUGUSTUS, 27 BC - 14 AD - MACEDONIA, PHILIPPI - AE 19

weight 4,46gr. ; bronze Ø 16mm.

obv. Bare head of Augustus right, AVG behind
rev. Two colonists (or priests) ploughing right with two oxen 

Philippi was an important city in eastern Macedon which flourished in the Hellenistic, Roman, and Byzantine Periods. Situated between the Strymon and Nestos rivers, the city was valued in antiquity for its nearby gold mines. Site of the famous Battle of Philippi at the end of the Roman Republic, the city prospered in the Roman imperial era and, after a visit from St. Paul, became an important centre of early Christianity. Philippi continued to flourish as a major Byzantine city. Today the archaeological site has substantial remains including a theatre and four basilicas.

According to tradition, the city, under its first name of Krenides (or Datum), was founded circa 360 BC by settlers from nearby Thasos who were led by the Athenian Kallistratos. There is no archaeological evidence of a significant settlement prior to the 4th century BC but there had been small communities in the area since Neolithic times as attested by local rock art. When Krenides was attacked by Thracians the inhabitants looked to Philip II of Macedon for protection. Philip, no doubt with an eye on the wealth of the local gold mines, responded by taking the city and renaming it Philippi (or Philippoi), after himself, in circa 357 BC. Fortifications and a theatre were amongst the architectural additions made under Philip′s reign and he also drained the surrounding swamps. The city maintained its independence but to ensure continued loyalty from this new asset a number of Macedonians were permanently relocated to the city. According to the ancient historian Diodorus, the mines near Philippi produced a very respectable 1.000 talents each year. Following the death of Alexander and the subsequent Successor Wars, Phillipi was much sought after for its gold and convenient harbour, Neapolis (modern Kavala) but continued to act as an independent city under the Antigonid regime. This is attested in a decree found on Kos which dates to 243 BC and which grants the island′s sanctuary to Hera the right of asylum. When the Romans defeated the Macedon king at the Battle of Pydna in 168 BC, they divided Macedonia into four administrative districts. Philippi is not mentioned specifically but it is assumed it was in the first zone, the prima regio. In 146 BC Macedon became a single Roman province and Philippi one of its prominent centres. The city benefitted greatly from the construction of the via Egnatia, the major road which connected the area to the Adriatic in the south and the Dardanelles in the north. A well-planned forum was built, along with a basilica, and a commercial street joined the heart of the city to the via Egnatia. In 42 BC the city famously gave its name to the battle which saw Mark Antony and Octavian gain revenge on Julius Caesar′s assassins, Brutus and Cassius. The battle had involved the largest number of troops in Roman warfare up to that point. 19 legions of 110.000 men on the Triumvirate side faced 17 Republican legions of  90.000 men, and the result was 40.000 casualties and another nail in the coffin of the Republic. Philippi then became a Roman colony settled by army veterans and produced its own coinage. When Octavian defeated Mark Antony at the Battle of Actium in 31 BC, the city received another influx of new residents, this time settlers who had lost their land during reforms in Italy. From 27 BC the city gained the honorary title of Colonia Iulia Augusta Philippensis.The first Christian church in Europe was founded at Philippi (built on top of a tomb of a Hellenistic hero) which had become an important early Christian centre following a visit to the city by Paul the Apostle in 49 AD. Lydia was notable as the first European to be baptized there. In the following centuries Philippi flourished and benefitted from an extensive building programme. In Late Antiquity Philippi was a prominent city in the Eastern Empire and an episcopal seat. Once more the city′s urban landscape evolved to include large churches, towered buildings, and new city walls.

BMC 86 ; SNG.Copenhagen 282 ; McClean 7660 (Tiberius) ; RPC.1656
Attractive dark patina.
vf

160,00 



AUGUSTUS, 27 BC - 14 AD - MYSIA, PERGAMON - M. PLAUTIUS SILVANUS, PROCONSUL OF ASIA, 4-5 AD - AE 21

weight 5,65gr. ; bronze Ø 21mm.

obv. Togate figure of Proconsul M. Plautius Silvanus standing facing,
holding patera and being crowned by male figure (Demos of Pergamon)
wearing military dress ΣIΛBANON  ΠEPΓAMHNOI
rev. Temple with four columns enclosing statue of Augustus,
ΣEBACTON above, ΔHMOΦΩN below

Marcus Plautius Silvanus was the son of Urgulania, an Etruscan, and close friend of the empress Livia. It was Livia′s intercession that allowed Silvanus to climb the cursus honorum, leading to the consulate in 2 BC alongside Augustus. He was then made proconsul of Asia in 4-5 AD, followed by a posting as imperial legate in Galatia in 6 AD, where he may have been involved in suppressing the Isaurians. Whilst there, news broke of the Great Illyrian Revolt. In 7 AD Silvanus was summoned by Tiberius who was in charge of the military situation in Illyricum, ordering him to bring his troops to help suppress the revolt. He joined up with Caecina Severus, the imperial legate of Moesia and fought a major battle against the rebels at Sirmium. The Roman forces were victorious, but suffered very, very heavy losses. Silvanus remained at the head of his forces until 9 AD, during which time he served in Pannonia and Dalmatia. Although serving under Tiberius for the duration of the revolt, Tiberius had some doubts concerning Silvanus, especially his close connection with Tiberius′ mother Livia.

BMC 242 ; SNG.Copenhagen 461 ; SNG.von Aulock 1389 ; 
McClean 7715 ; Ashmoleon Museum Collection 1218 ; RPC.2364

dark patina
vf-

185,00 



AUGUSTUS, 27 BC - 14 AD - TROAS, ABYDOS - AE 13

weight 1,90gr. ; bronze Ø 13mm.

obv. Youthful portrait of Augustus right, star in front, CЄBACTOV behind
rev. Eagle standing right on thunderbolt, ABY behind

BMC- ; SNG.Copenhagen- ; SNG.von Aulock- ; 
McClean- ; Ashmoleon Museum Collection- ; cf. RPC.2285
RRR
RPC registrated only 2 specimens of this coin type.
Coin of the highest rarity in a wonderful condition.
vf/xf

795,00 



AUGUSTUS, 27 BC - 14 AD - PHYGIA, EUMENIA - EPIGONOS PHILOPATRIS (MAGISTRATE) - AE 17

weight 4,98gr. ; bronze Ø 17mm.

obv. Bare head of Augustus right, ΣЄBAΣTOΣ behind
rev. Tripod, EΠIΓONOΣ above, ΦIΛOΠATPIΣ on right,
EVMENEΩN on left

variety; no lituus in front of head (unpublished). Extremely rare.

cf. BMC 36 ; SNG.Copenhagen- ; SNG.von Aulock- ; cf. Waddington 6027 ;
McClean- ; Ashmoleon Museum Collection- ; cf. RPC.3142
RRR
f/vf

150,00 



AUGUSTUS, 27 BC - 14 AD - LYCIA, MASIKYTES - AR Drachm

weight 3,16gr. ; silver Ø 19mm.

obv. Head of Augustus right between
Λ - Y
rev. Two lyres with ear of corn between, MA above

BMC- ; SNG. Copenhagen- ; SNG.von Aulock 4353var. ; Troxell 122 R
vf

475,00 



AUGUSTUS, 27 BC - 14 AD - SYRIA, ANTIOCHIA AD ORONTEM - AR Tetradrachm, year 42 and 60 (12 AD)

weight 14,55gr.; silver Ø 26mm.

obv. Laureate head of Augustus right, surrounded by the legend; 
KAIΣAPOΣ  ΣEBAΣTOY
rev. City-goddess seated right on rock, holding palm-branch, river-god 
Orontes swimming right at her feet, BM above, monogram and X on right,
surrounded by the legend; ANTIOXEΩN MHTPOΠOΛEΩΣ

The two dates are reckoned according to the Actian and
the Caesarian Eras respectively, and are equivalent to 12 AD.

BMC 149 ; RPC.4159 ; AMC 1435 ; Prieur 58 ;
McAlee 188 ; cf. Sear GIC.106
R
vf

795,00 



AUGUSTUS, CAIUS, JULIUS & JULIA - CAIUS MARCIUS, triumvir monetalis - AR Denarius, Rome (13 BC)

weight 3,10gr.; silver Ø 18mm.

obv. Bare head of Augustus right, lituus behind, AVGVSTVS before
rev. Bare heads right of Lucius, Julia, and Caius; wreath above Julia,
III VIR above, C • MARIVS • TRO below

Struck by the triumvir monetalis Caius Marcius, Caii filius, Tromentina triumvir

This highly interesting dynactic type belongs to the period just prior to the death of Agrippa and depicts on reverse his wife Julia, the daughter of Augustus, together with their two sons who were clearly intended for the eventual succession. Extremely rare.

Cohen 1 (Caius, Lucius, Julia and Augustus) ;
RIC 404 (R3) ; BMC 106 ; Sear 1733
RRR
Flancrack, little hole and oxidation. 
f/vf

2.500,00 



AUGUSTUS & AGRIPPA - GALLIA - AE Dupondius, Nemausus (16-10 BC)

weight 5,22gr. ; bronze Ø 22mm.

obv. Heads of Agrippa and Augustus back to back,
that of Agrippa wearing combined rostral crown and laurel wreath,
that of Augustus bare, IMP above, DIVI F below
rev. Crocodile chained to palm branch, wreath tied to palm;
two branches below, COL NEM (NE ligate) above

In 27 BC Augustus conferred on this colonie of southern Gaul the title of Colonia Augusta Nemausus and the initial issue of Dupondii with the heads of Augustus and Agrippa is dated by RPC to this time. However, the omission on the title Augustus in the obverse legend suggest a slightly earlier date, perhaps 29-28 BC. Subsequent revivals of the original type would appear to span the following four decades, with only minor changes to the original design.

Normally dupondii of this type weight between 10 and 15 gram with a diameter of circa 25mm. This piece however is with a diameter of 22mm. much smaller, and also the weight of 5,22 gram is exceptional low. Maybe it concerns here a smaller denomination (as ?). Highly interesting and very rare as such.

cf. Cohen 7 ; cf. RIC 157 ; cf. RPC.523 ; cf. CRE Ashmolean 413; 
cf. SNG Hunterian 149 ; Sear 1729var
RR
Edge lightly corroded., for the rest attractive piece with dark patina.
vf-

450,00 



TIBERIUS, 14-37 - AE Dupondius, probably Commagene (19-20)

weight 16,84gr. ; bronze Ø 30mm.

obv. Laureate head right, surrounded by the legend;
TI CAESAR DIVI AVGVSTI F AVGVSTVS
rev. Crossed cornucopiae on either side of winged caduceus
PONT MAXIM COS III IMP VII TR POT XXII

Cohen 8 ; RIC 90 ; BMC 175 ; RPC.3869 ; Butcher 69 R
Attractive dark patina. Rare.
f/vf

165,00 



TIBERIUS, 14-37 - AV Aureus, Lugdunum (14-37)

weight 7,79gr. ; gold Ø 18mm.

obv. Laureate head of Tiberius right, surrounded by the legend;
TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS
rev. Female (Livia as Pax?) seated right on chair, holding
sceptre and olive-branch, PONTIF in front, MAXIM behind

Following a series of early issues honouring Divus Augustus and Tiberius′ military triumphs, the mint at Lugdunum settled upon striking one single type: ′Pontif Maxim′. Numismatists identify the seated figure depicted on this ubiquitous reverse type as Livia, the wife of Augustus and mother of Tiberius, in the guise of Pax, the roman personification of peace. The type was struck continuously for twenty three years and throughout that time, only minor changes were made to the portrait of Tiberius and the ornamentation of the throne. Despite the vast output of the ′Pontif Maxim′ coinage, the significance of the type is not immediately clear - the depiction of Livia as Pax may represent a universal matronly ideal; Livia may be intended as the personification of what Seneca the Younger described in AD 55 as the ′Pax Romana′ (′Roman Peace′), the period of peace and stability marked by Octavian′s victory over Mark Antony at the battle of Actium in 31 BC, which brought to an end to the prolonged period of civil war. Certainly, during the last decade of the 1st century BC Livia began to appear more frequently in the preserved sources, and L. Brännstedt (Femina princeps: Livia′s position in the Roman state) suggests that ″her role as mater and uxor at this time was becoming an integral part of Augustus′ political program, and being made publicly manifest on a large scale.″ Brännstedt furthermore asserts that ″the appointment on March 6, 12 BC of Augustus as pontifex maximus was crucial for the development of Livia′s mater-role... Augustus′ religious role was identified as that of a father to his family. Strengthening the paternal connotations of Augustus′ leadership, the appointment of him as pontifex maximus would also have favoured Livia′s impact as mater″. The identification of Livia with Pax therefore strongly associated the imperial family with the continued prosperity of the empire, and hence should be seen as primarily a propagandistic instrument for the reinforcement of the imperial cult.

Cohen 15 ; RIC 25 (R2) ; BMC 30 ; Sear 1760 ; Calicó 305 R
(cf. Roma Numismatics auction XVII, lot 710 about unc  GBP 30.000 + 20% ;
this coin is actually better in detail than the Roma Numismatics piece).

Very faint scratch on the obverse, but wonderful coin of good style and
with excellent details. Coin with much lustre. Near mintstate.
xf/unc à unc-

19.000,00 



TIBERIUS, 14-37 - AE As, Asia Minor (Commagene ?), circa 34-35 AD

weight 13,95gr. ; bronze Ø 29mm.

obv. Laureate head left   TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVST IMP VIII
rev. Winged caduceus between S - C, around the legend  
PONTIF MAXIM TRIBVN POTEST XXXVI 

This a rather strange coin. It has been found in eastern Turkey. The reverse legend is in mirror script and the style of the coin tells us that it is certainly not from Rome. Probably it concerns here a local imitation from the area of Commagene. Extremely rare and unpublished.

Cohen 21var. ; RIC 53var. ; BMC 107var. ; RPC.- ;
Banti & Simonetti- ; Sear 1771var. 
RRRR
Minor traces of oxidation. Dark patina.
xf-

1.650,00 



TIBERIUS, 14-37 - AE Sestertius, Rome (35-36 AD)

weight 25,50gr. ; orichalcum Ø 33mm.

obv. Empty horse-drawn triumphal quadriga, marching right,
ornamented with trophy, Victory crowning trophy and captive.
rev. TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVST PM TR POT XXXVII
surrounding large S C

This coin seems to refer to Tiberius′ military successes. Tiberius was a brilliant military commander who expanded the empire and provided it with a defensible border with his younger brother Drusus and nephew Germanicus. The artist took considerable pains to render the form and decoration of the currus triumphalis. The car itself is of the ″slow″ type, which is a high, cylindrical shell with straight side edges. From the left we see a trophy consisting of a suit of armor on a pole, crowned with a helmet and hung on either side with an oval shield, followed by a winged Victory and again a trophee. Below, above the wheel, a bust of a barbarian is shown. It probably refers to Tiberius′ successes between 16-7 BC in the Danube area and his triumph of 6-9 AD. The German Marcomanni confederation had established a strong kingdom in modern Bohemia. Tiberius and another Roman general launched a two-pronged attack that devastated the Marcomanni. In 6 AD, Tiberius was called away from the Danube to prevent a German breakthrough after the Roman defeat at Teutoberg Forest. He accomplished this mission and was then called back to the Danube frontier. The Great Illyrian Revolt of 6-9 AD saw all the tribes in the western Balkans rise in rebellion. This was one of the greatest revolts against Rome in the history of the Empire, and the rebels could muster an army of 100.000 men. Tiberius and his nephew Germanicus eventually suppressed the rebellion, which earned them both Augustus and Rome′s gratitude. Tiberius was a great commander, and historians have neglected his accomplishments. He annexed two new provinces, established a frontier on the Danube that was not penetrated by invaders for almost two centuries. Tiberius′ greatest military achievement was his role in the suppression of the Great Illyrian Revolt.

Cohen 66 ; RIC 60 ; BMC 113 ; Sear 1765  R
Attractive dark patina. Rare.
vf à vf/xf

1.895,00 



TIBERIUS, 14-37 - SPAIN - BAETICA, ITALICA - AE 29 or as

weight 15,35gr. ; bronze 29mm.

obv. head of Tiberius, bare, right, surrounded by the legend;
TI CAESAR AVGVSTVS PONT MAX IMP
rev. Altar inscribed PROVIDE / NTIAE / AVGVSTI,
surrounded by the legend; MVNIC ITALIC PERM DIVI AVG

Cohen 89 ; Vives 168–9, Chaves 115–263, GMI 1040–51 ;
Heiss 380, 8 ; Sear GIC 253 ; ACIP 3333 ; Burgos 1250 ; RPC.I, 65

Attractive dark patina. Wonderful portrait.
vf+/vf

295,00 



TIBERIUS, 14-37 - MACEDONIA, UNCERTAIN MINT (PELLA or DIUM ?) - AE 24 or as

weight 11,56gr. ; bronze 24mm.
Magistrates (duoviri quinquennalis) C. Baebius P.f. & L.Rusticelius Basterna

obv. Head of Tiberius, bare, right, surrounded by the legend;
TI CAESAR AVG F AVGVSTVS
rev. C•BAEBIVS•P•F / L•RVSTICELIVS / BASTERNA /  III•VIR QVINQ / D D

De mints of Pella and Dium are suggested for this coin type. Rare.

ZfN 1926, 132–3, no. 187; Sutherland 74, no. 4 ; RPC.I, 1536 R
Attractive dark patina. Good portrait.
vf

240,00 



TIBERIUS, 14-37 - LYDIA - MAGISTRATE SAKANTES - AE 17, Hypaepa

weight 4,61gr. ; bronze Ø 17mm.

obv. Laureate head of Tiberius right  TIBEPION ΣEBAΣTON
rev. Zeus standing left, holding patera (?) and wreath or branch
YΠAIΠHNΩN ΣAKANTHΣ

Tiberian coinage for Hypaepa is poorly known, as there are very few
specimens, which are usually hard to read. In RPC only 1 example is
listed for the type offered here. Extremely rare.

BMC- ; SNG. von Aulock- ; SNG.Copenhagen- ;
Weber collection- ; RPC.2573A (1 example)
RRRR
Attractive coin with dark patina.
vf+

775,00 



TIBERIUS,14-37 - PHRYGIA, LAODIKEA AD LYKOS - MAGISTRATE PYTHES - AE 17

weight 4,21gr. ; bronze Ø 17mm.

obv. Bare portrait of Pyhes right ΠYΘHΣ
rev. Laureate and bearded head of Demos right
ΛAOΔIKEΩN  ΔHMOΣ

The attribution to Tiberius is uncertain. The portraiture indicates that the coin was not minted  before late in the reign of Augustus, but it is not easy to decide whether Augustus, Tiberius, Caligula or even Claudius. It is also not the emperor′s head showing on this coin, but that of magistrate Pythes. Very rare.

BMC 55 ; SNG.Copenhagen 509 ; Waddington 6259 ;

RPC.2902 ;
Aufhäuser Auktion 19, lot. 266 RR
dark patina
f/vf

650,00 



TIBERIUS, 14-37 - ISSUE IN HONOUR OF DIVUS AUGUSTUS - AE Sestertius, Rome (36-37 AD)

weight 27,10gr. ; orichalcum Ø 33mm.

obv. Team of four elephants drawing ornamented car left, surmounted by seated
statue of Augustus, holding branch and sceptre  DIVO AVGVSTO S•P•Q•R
rev.  TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVST PM TR POT XXXIIX

This type has been minted in honour of Divus Augustus.

Cohen 308 ; RIC 68 ; BMC 125 ; Sear 1784 R
vf-

1.350,00 



TIBERIUS, 14-37 - ISSUE IN HONOUR OF DIVUS AUGUSTUS - MYSIA - AE 20, Pergamon (circa 20-29 AD)

weight 4,86gr. ; bronze Ø 20mm.

obv. Laureate heads of Augustus and Tiberius facing one another,
ΣEBAΣTOI above, EΠI ΠOΠΠAIOY below
rev. Livia seated right on throne, holding sceptre and grain ears,
around the text; ΣEBAΣTHN ΠEPΓAMHNΩN MHNOΓENHΣ

minted in name of Poppaeus, proconsul & Menogenes, magistrate

RPC I 2368 ; BMC 251 R
minor traces of oxidation
vf-/f+

235,00 



TIBERIUS, 14-37 - ISSUE IN HONOUR OF DIVUS AUGUSTUS - SYRIA, SELEUKIA AND PIERIA - AR Tetradrachm (circa 14-20), Antiochia ad Orontem

weight 14,25gr. ; silver Ø 26mm.

obv. Laureate head of Tiberius right, around the text;
TIBEPIOΣ · ΣEBA - ΣTOΣ · KAIΣAP
rev. Radiate head of Divus Augustus right, around the text;
ΘEOΣ · ΣEBA - ΣTOΣ · KAIΣAP ·

Coin of great importance. Only three known to Prieur and RPC,
four in CoinArchives. Extremely rare.

cf. NAC auction 64, lot 1082 in xf; SFR 34.000 + 17,5%.

McAlee 211 ; SNG.Copenhagen 144 ; Prieur 60 ; RPC I 4161 RRR
f/vf

6.950,00 



TIBERIUS GEMELLUS (?), HEIR OF TIBERIUS - LYDIA - AE 15, Philadelphia (circa 35-37 AD)

weight 2,64gr. ; bronze Ø 15mm.

obv. Bare head Tiberius right, around the text;
TIBEPIΩN  ΣE - BAΣTΩN
rev. Winged thunderbolt, around the text; NEOKAIΣAPEIΣ

The city of Philadelphia was called Neocaesarea Philadelphia for a short period, probably from Tiberius to Claudius. Therefor this type has been attributed to Philadelphia. The obverse legend TIBEPIΩN refers to a Tiberius. The portrait does not really resemble that of emperor Tiberius, but more that of a very young male person. Tiberius Gemellus, heir of emperor Tiberius, and Brittanicus (Tiberius Claudius Caesar Britannicus) have been suggested. Of these two persons, Tiberius Gemellus seems to be the most likely. Highly interesting and very rare.

Tiberius Julius Caesar Nero Gemellus, known as Tiberius Gemellus, was born on 10 October 19 AD as s the son of Drusus and Livilla, the grandson of the Emperor Tiberius, and the cousin of the Emperor Caligula. Gemellus is a nickname meaning "the twin". His twin brother, Tiberius Claudius Caesar Germanicus II Gemellus, died as a young child in 23. His father and older cousins died, and are suspected by contemporary sources as having been systematically eliminated by the powerful praetorian prefect Sejanus. Their removal allowed Gemellus and Caligula to be named joint-heirs by Tiberius in 35, a decision that ultimately resulted in Caligula assuming power and having Gemellus killed (or forced to kill himself) in late 37 or early 38.

A similar coin was struck in the name of Caius Caesar (Caligula), but with mentioning te mint “ΦIΛAΔELΦEωN” (RPC suppl. 3029A). At the death of Tiberius on 16 March 37, succession by Caligula was the obvious choice, unlike the often-changing succession candidates under Emperor Augustus. Although Tiberius had named Caligula′s nephew, Tiberius Gemellus, as co-heir in his will, the Senate declared the will invalid. Caligula thus became the new emperor.

cf. NAC, auction 72, lot 591in vf+ (SFR 1.200 + 18%)

SNG. von Aulock- ; SNG.Copenhagen 373 ;
Waddington 6359 ; RPC.3017
RR
f/vf

850,00 



DRUSUS, SON OF TIBERIUS - AE Sestertius, Rome (22-23)

weight 27,02gr. ; bronze Ø 35mm.

obv. Two crossed cornucopiae, each surmounted by head of one of the twin sons
of Drusus; Tiberius Gemellus and Germanicus. Long winged caduceus on background.
rev. Large S C, around DRVSVS CAESAR TI AVG F DIVI AVG N PONT TR POT II

Drusus was married to his paternal cousin, Livilla, to bring him closer to the Julians. Tacitus says she was unattractive as a child, but grew up to be beautiful. Their daughter Julia was born not long after the marriage, and they had twin sons: Tiberius Gemellus (19-37) and Tiberius Claudius Caesar Germanicus II Gemellus (19-23) on 10 October 19, the latter of whom died while still an infant in 23. Both Gemellus and Caligula were named joint-heirs by Tiberius in 35, a decision that ultimately resulted in Caligula assuming power and having Gemellus killed, or by forcing him to kill himself, in late 37 (or maybe early 38). The birth of his sons was commemorated on this sestertius.

The crossed-cornucopiae design is familiar on ancient coinage, and here the cornucopias, grape clusters, grape leaves and pine cones seemingly allude to Bacchus or Liber in a reference to fecundity. In terms of dynastic appeal, the design boasts of the prosperity and fruitfulness of the Tiberian line, with the caduceus symbolizing Mercury as the messenger of the gods and the bringer of good fortune. Despite the hopefulness represented by this series of coins, tragedy struck on two fronts. The ′Tiberian dynasty′ collapsed within months of its being announced when both Drusus and his son Germanicus Gemellus (the boy whose head is shown on the right cornucopia) died in 23. Poor fates awaited the remaining two members: Drusus′ wife Livilla became increasingly associated with Tiberius′ prefect Sejanus, and she died shamefully in the aftermath of his downfall in 31, and the second grandson, Tiberius Gemellus, survived long enough to be named co-heir of Tiberius with Caligula, but after Tiberius′ death he was pushed into a subsidiary role and soon was executed by Caligula, who would not tolerate a second heir to the throne.

Cohen 1 ; RIC 42 ; BMC 95 ; Sear 1793 R

(cf. NAC, auction 14, lot 600 in vf/xf with light oxidation; CHF 26.000 + 21%)
Very attractive coin with dark patina. Rare.
good vf

2.950,00 



DRUSUS, SON OF TIBERIUS - As, Rome (22-23)

weight 10,22gr. ; bronze Ø 29mm.

obv. Bare head of Drusus left, surrounded by the legend;
DRVSVS CAESAR AVG F DIVI AVG N
rev. Large S C surrounded by the legend;
PONTIF TRIBVN POTEST ITER

Drusus was married to his paternal cousin, Livilla, to bring him closer to the Julians. Tacitus says she was unattractive as a child, but grew up to be beautiful. Their daughter Julia was born not long after the marriage, and they had twin sons: Tiberius Gemellus (19-37) and Tiberius Claudius Caesar Germanicus II Gemellus (19-23) on 10 October 19, the latter of whom died while still an infant in 23. Both Gemellus and Caligula were named joint-heirs by Tiberius in 35, a decision that ultimately resulted in Caligula assuming power and having Gemellus killed, or by forcing him to kill himself, in late 37 (or maybe early 38).

Cohen 2 ; RIC 45 ; BMC 99 ; Sear 1794 S
Minor oxidation and some weak areas. Scarce coin.
f/vf

135,00 



DRUSES & GERMANICUS - LYDIA, SARDES - ALEXANDER, high priest - AE 26, circa 23-26 AD)

weight 12,49gr. ; bronze Ø 26mm.

obv. Drusus and Germanicus seated left in curule chairs, surrounded by 
the legend; ΔPOYΣOΣ KAI ΓEPMANIKOΣ NEIOI ΘEOI ΦIΛAΔEΛΦOI
rev. KOINOY / AΣIAΣ in wreath, surrounded by the legend;
EΠI APXIEPEΩΣ AΛEΞANΔPOY KΛEΩNOΣ ΣAPΔIANOY

Minted in the name of Alexander of Sardis, son of Cleon,
high priest of the Koinon of Asia. Rare.

BMC 104 ; RPC.2994 ; SNG.Copenhagen 517 ; 
SNG.von Aulock 3143 ; Sear GIC.364
R
Attractive dark patina.
vf

575,00 



DRUSES & GERMANICUS - LYDIA, SARDES - ALEXANDER, high priest - AE 26, circa 23-26 AD)

weight 14,46gr. ; bronze Ø 28mm.

obv. Drusus and Germanicus seated left in curule chairs, surrounded by
the legend; ΔPOYΣOΣ KAI ΓEPMANIKOΣ NEIOI ΘEOI ΦIΛAΔEΛΦOI
rev. KOINOY / AΣIAΣ in wreath, surrounded by the legend;
EΠI APXIEPEΩΣ AΛEΞANΔPOY KΛEΩNOΣ ΣAPΔIANOY

Minted in the name of Alexander of Sardis, son of Cleon,
high priest of the Koinon of Asia. Rare.

BMC 104 ; RPC.2994 ; SNG.Copenhagen 517 ;
SNG.von Aulock 3143 ; Sear GIC.364  R
Minor traces of oxidation. Dark patina.
fr/zfr à vf-

350,00 



CALIGULA, 37-41 - AE Sestertius, Rome (37-38)

weight 25,65gr. ; bronze Ø 34mm.

obv. Laureate head left, surrounded by the legend;
C CAESAR AVG GERMANICVS PON M TR POT
rev. Gaius standing left on daïs, extending right hand in gesture of address;
behind him a sella castrensis (camp stool); in front of him stand five soldiers right,
all helmeted, holding shields, and parazonia; four aquilae behind them,
ADLOCVT above, COH below

Before a battle or on parade, the emperor would address his troops in an event known as an adlocutio cohortium (address to the cohorts). This was an important opportunity for the emperor to be present among his troops to inspire morale. This sestertius was issued on the occasion of a donative for the Praetorian Guard and was the first to employ the adlocutio as a reverse type.

Cohen 1 ; RIC 32 ; BMC 33 R
Very attractive and rare coin of good style, with dark patina.
vf

3.950,00 



CALIGULA, 37-41 - AE Sestertius, Rome (39-40 AD)

weight 25,74gr. ; Ø 33mm.

obv. Veiled and draped figure of Pietas, seated left, holding patera
and resting arm on small facing figure, surrounded by the legend;
C CAESAR DIVI AVG P M TR P IIII PP, PIETAS in exergue
rev. Hexastyle garlanded temple surmounted by quadriga, before which
veiled and togate Caligula sacrifices with patera over garlanded altar;
one attendant leads bull to the altar, a second holds patera;
DIVO AVG and S-C across fields.

This sestertius minted at Rome in 39/40 AD depicts on the obverse the personification of pietas, while the reverse depicts an elaborated sacrificial scene. On the obverse, Pietas is depicted seated, veiled and draped, holding a patera, with an arm resting on a small draped figure standing and facing. The inscription refers to Caligula as Caius Caesar Augustus Germanicus, pontifex maximus, holder of the tribunicia potestas, and mentions Pietas by name. On the obverse, the emperor, Gaius Caligula, standing left, veiled and togate, sacrifices over a garlanded altar with a patera in his hand; the victimarius, or the priest in charge of slaughtering the animal victim, is holding a bull for the sacrifice and an attendant is holding a patera. In the background, one sees the garlanded hexastyle temple of Divus Augustus with acroteria and statues of Romulus and Aeneas on top of it. The temple′s pediment is decorated with a sacrificial scene. The inscription recalls the dedication of the temple to the deified Augustus by the Senate.

Pietas, whose Greek equivalent was Eusebeia, was one of the chief virtues among the Romans. It was the virtue par excellence of Aeneas. According to Carlos Noreña, Pietas, together with Aequitas, Virtus, Liberalitas, and Providentia, was one of the five core virtues displayed on Roman imperial coinage. Indeed, Pietas was in fact the virtue that was most frequently displayed. Pietas consisted in ″fulfilling one′s responsibilities toward anyone or anything with whom one was bound in any way. The fulfillment of these responsibilities could be motivated by duties or obligations, in which case pietas was often connected with the notions of officium, fides, or religio, or by the deeper sentiments of love and affection″ (Noreña, Imperial Ideals in the Roman West, p. 71). Hence this virtue emphasized exemplary relations within the family, between men and gods, and between the Romans and their fatherland. The sacred nature of pietas was embodied by the divine personification Pietas, a goddess often represented on Roman coins from the Middle Republic onwards. Pietas is first represented on denarii issued by Marcus Herennius in 108 or 107 BC. Pietas was depicted as a woman conducting a sacrifice on an altar.

The Temple of Divus Augustus, erected to commemorate the deified Augustus, was built between the Palatine and the Capitoline Hills, behind the Basilica Iulia, on the site of the house that Augustus had inhabited before he started his public life. Although the temple is often depicted on coins as having an Ionic hexastyle design, its size, physical proportions and exact location are unknown. The decision to dedicate a temple to Augustus was taken by the Roman Senate shortly after the death of Augustus in 14 AD. However, it was not until 37 AD that the temple was finally completed, whereupon it was dedicated over the last two days of August that year - the month renamed in honour of Augustus. Caligula, as Pontifex Maximus, led the sacrificial ceremonies. According to Cassius Dio (59.7.4), the commemorative events ordered by Caligula were exceptionally extravagant: a two-day horse race took place along with the slaughter of 400 bears and ″an equal number of wild beasts from Libya″, and Caligula postponed all lawsuits and suspended all mourning ″in order that no one should have an excuse for failing to attend″. The emperor′s purpose in linking himself to Augustus is obvious: he wished to emphasize his legitimacy as a descendant of Augustus, as well as his personal pietas. As the message is conveyed in Latin, and as this emission was minted in Rome for the West, it was probably directed at the Italic and at the Western provincial elites. The last known reference to the temple was on 27 May AD 218; at some point thereafter it was completely destroyed and its stones were presumably quarried for later buildings; the site has never been excavated and its original appearance must be reconstructed only from its depictions on the Roman coinage of which the present type is the most significant.

Cohen 11 ; RIC 51 ; BMC 69 ; Sear 1802 R
Minor traces of oxidation. Rare.
vf

1.750,00 



CALIGULA, 37-41 - AE Sestertius, Rome (37-38 AD)

weight 25,89gr. ; Ø 33mm.

obv. Laureate head left, surrounded by the legend;
C CAESAR AVG GERMANICVS PON M TR POT
rev. S.P.Q.R  /  P. P  /  OB. CIVES  /  SERVATOS in oak-wreath

The legend OB CIVIS SERVATOS ″for having saved the citizens″ refers to Corona Civica, a civic crown of oak-leaf. It was a simple honor, in the Roman tradition, awarded by the senat for rescuing a comrade in battle and was placed over the door of the awarded citizen. This honor is rooted in military tradition. The senate awarded it to Octavian ″ob cives servatos″, for rescuing all his fellow citizens. Additionally, oak is associated with Jupiter. The letters S C (Senato Consulto ; ″by decree of the senat″, is omitted on this coin. Reason was probably to avoid reference to two different decrees of the Senate on the same coin. We see this also on Corono Civica sestertii of Claudius and Caligula′s Carpentum sestertius for his mother, with reverse legend SPQR MEMORIAE AGRIPPINAE.

The reverse type with P(ater) P(atriae) and OB•CIVES SERVATOS shows the honorific bestowed upon the emperor by the Roman senate upon his ascension. These honors aling with the obverse honors of Pon(tifex) M(aximus) and Tr(ibunicias) Pot(estas) run the whole gamut of titles earned by Augustus. Sadly, Caligula would prove to merit none of the honors as his rule, which started with much hope, quickly eroded to the point that he was eventually killed by his own praetorian guard. The portrait style here is highly idealized as was the case with Augustus. Caligula takes on strong god-like qualities on this coin and the delicate engraving is a sign that the new school of Roman engravers started under the rule of Tiberius was still quite capable of executing artistic work.

Cohen 24 ; RIC 37 ; BMC 38 ; cf. Sear 1801 R
(cf. Numismatica Ars Classica, auction 86, lot 101  xf : CHF 65.000 + 19%)
Rare type. A magnificent portrait with excellent details and an appealing dark patina.
Work of a very skilled master engraver which resulted in incredibly finely detailed dies. 
xf-/xf

11.500,00 



CALIGULA, 37-41 - AE Sestertius, Rome (37-38 AD)

weight 24,77gr. ; Ø 36mm.

obv. Laureate head left, surrounded by the legend;
C CAESAR AVG GERMANICVS PON M TR POT

rev. S.P.Q.R  /  P. P  /  OB. CIVES  /  SERVATOS in oak-wreath

The legend OB CIVIS SERVATOS ″for having saved the citizens″ refers to Corona Civica, a civic crown of oak-leaf. It was a simple honor, in the Roman tradition, awarded by the senat for rescuing a comrade in battle and was placed over the door of the awarded citizen. This honor is rooted in military tradition. The senate awarded it to Octavian ″ob cives servatos″, for rescuing all his fellow citizens. Additionally, oak is associated with Jupiter. The letters S C (Senato Consulto ; ″by decree of the senat″, is omitted on this coin. Reason was probably to avoid reference to two different decrees of the Senate on the same coin. We see this also on Corono Civica sestertii of Claudius and Caligula′s Carpentum sestertius for his mother, with reverse legend SPQR MEMORIAE AGRIPPINAE.

The reverse type with P(ater) P(atriae) and OB•CIVES SERVATOS shows the honorific bestowed upon the emperor by the Roman senate upon his ascension. These honors aling with the obverse honors of Pon(tifex) M(aximus) and Tr(ibunicias) Pot(estas) run the whole gamut of titles earned by Augustus. Sadly, Caligula would prove to merit none of the honors as his rule, which started with much hope, quickly eroded to the point that he was eventually killed by his own praetorian guard. The portrait style here is highly idealized as was the case with Augustus. Caligula takes on strong god-like qualities on this coin and the delicate engraving is a sign that the new school of Roman engravers started under the rule of Tiberius was still quite capable of executing artistic work.

Cohen 24 ; RIC 37 ; BMC 38 ; cf. Sear 1801 R
(cf. Numismatica Ars Classica, auction 86, lot 101  xf : CHF 65.000 + 19%)
Very attractive coin with good portrait and dark patina. Rare.
vf/xf à vf+

3.950,00 



CALIGULA, 37-41 - LYDIA - ANTIOCHOS APOLLODOTOU, Magistrate - AE 14, Philadelphia (circa 35-37 AD)

weight 3,64gr. ; bronze Ø 14mm.

obv. Bare head of Caius Caesar right, ΓAIOC behind
KAICAP before
rev. Winged thunderbolt  ΦIΛAΔELΦEωN above,
ANTIOXOY below

A similar coin was struck in the name of Tiberius Gemellus, but with mentioning te mint “NEOKAIΣAPEIΣ” (RPC suppl. 3017). At the death of Tiberius on 16 March 37, succession by Caligula was the obvious choice, unlike the often-changing succession candidates under Emperor Augustus. Although Tiberius had named Caligula′s nephew, Tiberius Gemellus, as co-heir in his will, the Senate declared the will invalid. Caligula thus became the new emperor. Only 5 specimens listed. Extremely rare.

BMC- ; SNG.Copenhagen- ; SNG.von .Aulock- ; Weber- ; Lindgren collection- ;
RPC.suppl.3029A ;
Aufhäuser 9,no.279 ; Veiling A.G.Van der Dussen 24,no.2892 ;
SNG.München–
RRR
Attractive coin with dark patina.
vf+/vf

750,00 



CALIGULA, 37-41 AD - CAPPADOCIA - AR Drachm (37-38 AD), Caesarea

weight 3,77gr. ; silver Ø 18mm.

obv. Bare head of Caligula, with light beard, right,
surrounded by the legend; C CAESAR AVG GERMANICVS
rev. Lituus and simpulum, surrounded by the legend; 
IMPERATOR PONT MAX AVG TR POT

The simpulum, or simpuvium, was a small vessel or ladle with a long handle from the Roman era, used at sacrifices to make libations, and to taste the wines and other liquors which were poured on the head of the sacrificial victims. The simpulum was the sign of Roman priesthood, and one of the insignia of the College of Pontiffs. The lituus was a crooked wand (similar in shape to the top part of some Western European crosiers) used as a cult instrument in ancient Roman religion by augurs to mark out a ritual space in the sky (a templum). The passage of birds through this templum indicated divine favor or disfavor for a given undertaking. The lituus was also used as a symbol of office for the college of the augurs to mark them out as a priestly group. The simpulum is commonly shown with the lituus and other sacrificial and augural instruments.

Cohen 12 ; RIC 63 ; BMC 102 ; RPC.3624 RR
Wonderful coin with excellent details and dark tone.
Exceptional quality for this very rare coin.
Magnificent portrait of Caligula.
xf

4.950,00 



CALIGULA & DIVUS AUGUSTUS - AR Denarius, Lugdunum (37-38)

weight 3,72gr. ; silver Ø 19mm.

obv. Laureate head of Caligula right, surrounded by the legend;   
C•CAESAR•AVG GERM•P•M•TR•POT
rev. Radiate head of Augustus right, surrounded by the legend;  
DIVVS • AVG • PATER • PATRIAE •

Despite being perhaps the worst of all Roman emperors, Caligula′s coinage is interesting and attractive. Having inherited the imperial throne with virtually no experience of government or the military, Gaius Germanicus Caesar, nicknamed Caligula ("bootikins"), had no achievements to tout on his coinage. He thus fell back on advertising his blue-blooded lineage. Through his mother, Agrippina Sr., Gaius was descended from Augustus, and also Agrippa, the victor of Actium. His father was the Roman paragon Germanicus, son of Nero Claudius Drusus and nephew of Tiberius. Through his mother Antonia, Germanicus was the grandson of Mark Antony and Octavia, the sister of Augustus. Accordingly, many of Caligula′s coins recall his dynastic connections to both the Julians and the Claudians. This denarius type pairs his obverse portrait with a reverse effigy of the deified Augustus, who is shown wearing the radiate crown of godhead. Unfortunately, aristocratic genes did not translate into success as a ruler, as Rome would soon find out. His detailed portrait on this well-struck and attractively toned denarius seems to hint at his cruel, capricious nature, while the reverse depicts his great-grandfather, Augustus. Very rare historical coin.

Cohen 2 ; RIC 16 ; BMC 17 ; cf. Sear 1809 RR
(cf. Naumann Auktion 100, Lot 433 in vf+ ; € 11.000 + 18%)
Very attractive coin with wonderful  portrait of Caligula and Divus Augustus.
vf/xf à xf-

9.950,00 



MARCUS VIPSANIUS AGRIPPA, grandfather of Caligula - AE As, Rome (37-41)

weight 11,52gr. ; copper Ø 29mm.
Agrippa was the son-in-law of Augustus and the grandfather of Caligula

obv. Head of Agrippa left, wearing rostral crown  M•AGRIPPA•L•F•COS•III
rev. Neptune standing left, holding dolphin and trident, deviding large S - C

Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa was one of the most powerful and influential men who lived during the early days of the Roman Empire. Agrippa was a statesman, general, and most important of all, a close friend and son-in-law of Augustus, the first Emperor of Rome. Agrippa aided Augustus greatly in his rise to power, and continued play an important role during the latter′s reign. In addition to the numerous victories that he won as Augustus′ general, Agrippa also initiated a number of building projects which contributed to the beauty and grandeur of Rome.

Cohen 3 ; RIC 58 ; BMC 161 ; Sear 1812
vf-

295,00 



GERMANICUS, father of Caligula (37-41 AD) - AE As, Rome (37-38)

weight 10,04gr. ; copper Ø 29mm.

obv. Bare head left  GERMANICVS CAESAR TI AVGVST F DIVI  AVG N
rev. CAESAR AVG GERMANICVS PON M TR POT around large S C

Sear 1821 ; Cohen 1 ; RIC 35 ; BMC 49
vf/xf-

575,00 



AGRIPPINA THE ELDER, MOTHER OF CALIGULA - AE Sestertius, Rome (37-41 AD)

weight 26,89gr. ; orichalcum Ø 34mm.

Issue in honor of Agrippina, the deceased mother of Caligula (37 - 41 AD)
obv. Draped bust of Agrippina the Elder, right, her hair falling in queue down her neck,
surrounded by the legend; AGRIPPINA M F MAT C CAESARIS AVGVSTI
rev. Carpentum, with ornamented cover and sides, drawn right by two mules,
in upper field the legend; S P Q R MEMORIAE AGRIPPINAE

Three issues of sestertii were struck in honour of Agrippina Senior, one of the most tragically unfortunate women of Roman history. She began life as a favoured member of the Julio-Claudian family during the reign of her grandfather Augustus, and upon her marriage to Livia′s grandson Germanicus, she seemed destined to achieve the highest possible status. However, upon the death of Augustus and the accession of Tiberius, her life took a turn for the worse: supreme power had shifted from the bloodlines of the Julii to the Claudii. Though her marriage represented and ideal union of Julian and Claudian, it was not destined to survive Tiberius′ reign. Germanicus died late in 19 under suspicious circumstances, after which Agrippina devoted the next decade of her life to openly opposing Tiberius until in 29 he deprived her of freedom, and in 33 of life itself. 

The sestertii dedicated to Agrippina are easily segregated. The first, produced by her son Caligula, shows on its reverse a carpentum; the second, issued by her brother Claudius, shows SC surrounded by a Claudian inscription, and the third is simply a restoration of the Claudian type by Titus, on which the reverse inscription is instead dedicated to that emperor. Though both Caligula and Claudius portrayed Agrippina, each did so from their own perspective, based upon the nature of their relationship with her. The inscription on Caligula′s coin, AGRIPPINA M F MAT C CAESARIS AVGVSTI, describes her as the daughter of Marcus (Agrippa) and the mother of Gaius (Caligula). While Claudius also identifies her as Agrippa′s daughter, his inscription ends GERMANICI CAESARIS, thus stressing her role as the wife of his brother Germanicus. It is also worth noting that on the issue of Caligula Agrippina has a slender profile like that of her son, whereas on Claudius′ sestertii her face is more robust, in accordance with his appearance.

The carpentum reverse is not only a superbly executed type, but has a foundation in the recorded events of the day. Suetonius (Gaius 15) describes the measures taken by Caligula to honour his family at the outset of his reign, which included gathering the ashes of his mother and brothers, all victims of persecution during the reign of Tiberius. Upon returning to Rome, Caligula, with his own hands, transferred to an urn his mother′s ashes ″with the utmost reverence″; he then instituted Circus games in her honour, at which ″…her image would be paraded in a covered carriage.″ There can be little doubt that the carpentum on this sestertius relates to the special practice initiated by Caligula. The inscription, SPQR MEMORIAE AGRIPPINAE, is itself dedicatory from the Senate and the Roman people to the memory
of Agrippina.

Cohen 1 ; RIC 55 ; BMC 81 ; Sear 1827
Very minor tooling in the field, but overall a
very attractive coin with dark brown patina. Rare.
vf

2.850,00 



AGRIPPINA THE ELDER, MOTHER OF CALIGULA - AE Sestertius ,Rome (37-41)

weight 26,48gr. ; orichalcum Ø 34mm.

Issue in honor of Agrippina, the deceased mother of Caligula (37 - 41 AD)
obv. Draped bust of Agrippina the Elder, right, her hair falling in queue down her neck,
surrounded by the legend; AGRIPPINA M F MAT C CAESARIS AVGVSTI
rev. Carpentum, with ornamented cover and sides, drawn right by two mules,
in upper field the legend; S P Q R MEMORIAE AGRIPPINAE

Three issues of sestertii were struck in honour of Agrippina Senior, one of the most tragically unfortunate women of Roman history. She began life as a favoured member of the Julio-Claudian family during the reign of her grandfather Augustus, and upon her marriage to Livia′s grandson Germanicus, she seemed destined to achieve the highest possible status. However, upon the death of Augustus and the accession of Tiberius, her life took a turn for the worse: supreme power had shifted from the bloodlines of the Julii to the Claudii. Though her marriage represented and ideal union of Julian and Claudian, it was not destined to survive Tiberius′ reign. Germanicus died late in 19 under suspicious circumstances, after which Agrippina devoted the next decade of her life to openly opposing Tiberius until in 29 he deprived her of freedom, and in 33 of life itself. 

The sestertii dedicated to Agrippina are easily segregated. The first, produced by her son Caligula, shows on its reverse a carpentum; the second, issued by her brother Claudius, shows SC surrounded by a Claudian inscription, and the third is simply a restoration of the Claudian type by Titus, on which the reverse inscription is instead dedicated to that emperor. Though both Caligula and Claudius portrayed Agrippina, each did so from their own perspective, based upon the nature of their relationship with her. The inscription on Caligula′s coin, AGRIPPINA M F MAT C CAESARIS AVGVSTI, describes her as the daughter of Marcus (Agrippa) and the mother of Gaius (Caligula). While Claudius also identifies her as Agrippa′s daughter, his inscription ends GERMANICI CAESARIS, thus stressing her role as the wife of his brother Germanicus. It is also worth noting that on the issue of Caligula Agrippina has a slender profile like that of her son, whereas on Claudius′ sestertii her face is more robust, in accordance with his appearance.

The carpentum reverse is not only a superbly executed type, but has a foundation in the recorded events of the day. Suetonius (Gaius 15) describes the measures taken by Caligula to honour his family at the outset of his reign, which included gathering the ashes of his mother and brothers, all victims of persecution during the reign of Tiberius. Upon returning to Rome, Caligula, with his own hands, transferred to an urn his mother′s ashes ″with the utmost reverence″; he then instituted Circus games in her honour, at which ″…her image would be paraded in a covered carriage.″ There can be little doubt that the carpentum on this sestertius relates to the special practice initiated by Caligula. The inscription, SPQR MEMORIAE AGRIPPINAE, is itself dedicatory from the Senate and the Roman people to the memory
of Agrippina.

Cohen 1 ; RIC 55 ; BMC 81 ; Sear 1827
vf-

1.950,00 



NERO & DRUSUS, BROTHERS OF CALIGULA - AE Dupondius, Rome (37-38)

weight 14,97gr. ; orichalcum Ø 29mm.

obv. Nero and Drusus Caesar riding right cloaks flying,
surrounded by the legend; NERO ET DRVSVS CAESARES
rev. Large S C, surrounded by the legend;
C CAESAR AVG GERMANICVS PON M TR POT

Nero and Drusus Caesar were Caligula′s older brothers. Both were destined to be heir to the throne but died prematurely in captivity for political reasons. Their younger brother Caligula was spared this fate and he often stayed in the company of Emperor Tiberius on the island of Capri. He eventually became the successor of Tiberius. He honored his brothers through this coinage, among other things.

Cohen 1 ; RIC 34 ; BMC 44 ; Sear 1828var. R
Very minor traces of oxitation. Rare.
vf-

395,00 



CLAUDIUS, 41-54 - AE As, Rome (41-42)

weight 10,99gr. ; copper Ø 28mm.

obv. Bare head of Claudius left, around the text;
TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR P IMP

rev. Constantia, helmeted and in military dress, standing left,
her right arm raised and holding spear in left, around the text;
CONSTANTIAE AVGVSTI, S - C across fields

Punched letters "C S" on the obverse left field. There also seems to be an indistinct punched mark on the emperor′s jaw. The meaning and/or reason of this punched letters and mark are unknown to me. Needs more study. Interesting and very rare as such. Needs more study. Very rare as such.

Cohen 14 ; RIC 95 ; BMC 140 ; Sear 1857
vf-

295,00 



CLAUDIUS, 41-54 - AE As, Provincial issue (42)

weight 13,36gr. ; copper Ø 28mm.

obv. Bare head of Claudius left  TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG IMP P M TR P
rev. Constantia, helmeted and in military dress, standing left, her right arm raised
and holding spear in left  CONSTANTIAE AVGVSTI, S - C in field

Legend variety with IMP P M TR P instead of the usual PM TR P IMP. Probably this coin was not minted in Rome, but in a provincial mint (Gaul ?). Unpublished as such. Extremely rare.

Cohen- (cf. 14) ; RIC- (cf. 95) ; BMC- (cf. 140) ; Sear- (cf. 1857) RRR

f/vf à f+

325,00 



CLAUDIUS, 41-54 - AR Denarius, Lugdunum, 46-47

weight 3,44gr. ; silver Ø 18mm.

obv. Laureate head righ, surrounded by the legend;
TI CLAVD CAESAR AVG P M TR P VI IMP XI
rev. Triunphal arch surmounted by an equestrian statue between two trophies,
DE BRITANN on architrave

The invasion of Britain ordered by the emperor Claudius in A.D. 43,  was a much a political gesture designed to bolster the emperor′s own position in Rome as it was an answer to a perceived military threat or economically motivated effort to seize territory. This can be best illustrated in the emperor′s own personal appearance in Britain to see the fall of the Camulodunum (Colchester) the capital of Rome′s main enemy the Catuvellauni. In addition, Claudius had two triumphal arches erected in Rome to commemorate what was touted as Claudius′s own personal triumph. Following the invasion, he even gave his own son the name Britannicus, depicted on an extremely rare issue of sestertii. It is therefore not surprising that the event should be commemorated on both Imperial and Provincial. It has even been suggested that the legend DE BRITANN or ′from Britain′ on the Imperial issues of aureii and denarii, may refer to bullion seized during the campaign. Even is this is not true, it would of perhaps made sense as a worthwhile piece of imperial propaganda, given the geographer Strabo′s claims about the mineral wealth of the island. The Claudius′s invasion only began the process of conquering and pacifying Britain. Sadly, the coinage is silent about the later campaigns conducted under Nero and the Flavians. Whilst disastrous events like the Boudiccan revolt were perhaps not suitable for any form of joyful commemoration. It might have seemed appropriate that the coinage noted the military gains made in Wales and Northern Britain. However the coins are silent on these events, events in other provinces like the revolt in Judea and the Civil War that followed Nero′s assassination, perhaps overshadowing events in Britain.

Probably the most iconic coin type of Claudius′ reign, this silver denarius depicts a triumphal arch celebrating the invasion of Britain. This silver denarius would likely have circulated among the very soldiers responsible for fighting in the campaign, a reminder of the emperor′s gratitude towards them. It would also have served to broadcast the emperor′s conquest to the wider roman world, proclaiming Claudius as the powerful conqueror of Brittania.

Cohen 18 ; RIC 34 ; BMC 35 ; cf. Sear 1843 RR
This coin was found with a metaldetector in the 1980′s in the city of Nijmegen (Netherlands).
Very rare and attractive historical coin with fine details.
vf/xf-

4.500,00 



CLAUDIUS, 41-54 - AR Cistophoric tetradrachm, Ephesos (41-42 AD)

weight 10,61gr. ; silver Ø 26mm.
The cistophor had the value of 3 denarii.

obv. Bare head of Claudius left  TI CLAVD CAES AVG
rev. Frontal view of tetrastyle temple of Artemis (Diana) at Ephesos,
her cult statue within with fillets hanging from her wrists, polos on her head;
the temple stands on a podium of four steps and has a pediment decorated
with figures, DIAN on left side, EPHE on right side

The cistophoros would be minted under Claudius for the first time since the great coinage of this denomination by Augustus. The Claudian mintages were nowhere near as extensive and the pieces that are seen usually show significant wear indicating that they circulated heavily. RIC indicates these issues may all be commemorative in nature and were not intended to be a regular coinage for the area. Of the cistophoros issues of Claudius there are four main types; those including Agrippina (his wife); the issues dedicated to Artemis (Diana) and het temple, as here; the issues with ROM ET AVG temple reverses; and, late in his reign the issues identifying Nero as his successor.

Artemis herself was the Goddess of the hunt but here probably refers to her role as Goddess of childbirth. RIC dates this coin likely to 41-42 AD based on the absence of titles in the legend and the fact the head is not laureate. Yet the ROM ET AVG issues of Pergamon are undated by RIC, however these two types share an almost identical obverse design.

provenance: ex. collection Hannelore Scheiner

Cohen 30 ; RIC 118 ; BMC 229 ; RPC.2222 ; Sear 1839 R
Historical coin of great style. Rare.
vf/xf

3.750,00 



CLAUDIUS, 41-54 - AE As, Rome (81-82)

weight 8,92gr. ; copper Ø 26mm.
Restauration coinage during the reign of Domitianus (81-96)

obv. Bare head right  TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG PM TR P IMP PP
rev. Minerva standing right, brandishing spear and holding shield 
IMP D AVG REST S C

Cohen- ; RIC II¹ 462 ; RIC II² 829 ; BMC 512 ; Sear 2899 R
Minor tooling. Rare cointype with attractive portrait.
vf

385,00 



CLAUDIUS, 41-54 - AE As, Rome (41-42)

weight 10,81gr. ; copper Ø 29mm.

obv. Bare head left, around the text;  TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG PM TR P IMP PP
rev. Libertas standing facing, head right, holding pileus,
left hand extended, S - C across field, around the text;  LIBERTAS AVGVSTVS

Cohen 47 ; RIC 113 ; BMC 202 ; Sear 1860
very attractive coin of good style
vf+

395,00 



CLAUDIUS, 41-54 - AE As, Rome (42)

weight 10,23gr. ; copper Ø 28mm.

obv. Bare head left, around the text; 
TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG PM TR P IMP PP
rev. Libertas standing facing, head right, holding pileus, 
left hand extended, S - C across field, around the text; 
LIBERTAS AVGVSTVS

Cohen 47 ; RIC 113 ; BMC 202 ; Sear 1860
attractive dark green patina
vf-

175,00 



CLAUDIUS, 41-54 - AE As, Rome (42)

weight 9,30gr. ; copper Ø 28mm.

obv. Bare head left, around the text;
TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG PM TR P IMP PP
rev. Libertas standing facing, head right, holding pileus,
left hand extended, S - C across field, around the text;
LIBERTAS AVGVSTVS

Cohen 47 ; RIC 113 ; BMC 202 ; Sear 1860
some oxidation an dlight scratches

fr/vg

30,00 



CLAUDIUS, 41-54 - Quadrans, Rome (1 jan. - 4 jan.42)

weight 2,62gr. ; copper Ø 17mm.

obv. Modius on three legs
TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG
rev. S C surrounded by the legend; PON M TR P IMP COS II

This coin type was minted from 1 - 4 januari 42. 
This short period is probably the reason of its rarity. Extremely rare.

Cohen- (cf. 72) ; RIC 88 (R3) ; BMC- ; Sear- (cf. 640) RRR
Attractive dark patina.
vf

550,00 



CLAUDIUS, 41-54 - AE Sestertius, Rome (41-42)

weight 23,32gr. ; orichalcum Ø 32mm.

obv. Laureate head of Claudius right, around the text;
TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG PM TR P IMP
rev. EX  SC / O B / CIVES / SERVATOS within oak-wreath

Reverse: The reverse reads “EX SC PP OB CIVES SERVATOS”, meaning “Senatus Consulto” (approved by the Senate), “Pater Patriae” (to the father of his country), “Ob Cives Servatos” (For having saved the citizens).

The corona civica was originally a military honour bestowed upon a Roman who had saved a fellow citizen′s life in battle. It was one of the greatest public honours. In the imperial era the honour developed from a coveted military decoration into an imperial emblem granted by the Senate to the emperor. The wreath was made of oak leaves and is sometimes called a corona quercea after the common name for the oak. Plutarch believed the oak was chosen for this highest of honours for several reasons. The tree was easily found throughout the countryside and was quite convenient for fashioning a wreath when the need arose. Also, the oak is sacred to Jupiter and Juno and thus was an appropriate symbolic honour given to one who has saved the life of a fellow Roman citizen. Finally, the early settlers of Rome, the Arcadians, were nicknamed ′acorn-eaters′ in an oracle of Apollo.

Cohen 39 ; RIC 96 ; BMC 115 ; Sear 1849 R
Minor tooling and roughness. Excellent portrait. Rare.
xf/vf+

2.250,00 



CLAUDIUS, 41-54 - AE Quadrans, Rome (42)

weight 3,52gr. ; copper Ø 18mm.

obv. Hand holding scales, P N R between te pans
rev. PON M TR P IMP PP COS II around large S C

Cohen 73 ; RIC 91 ; BMC 181 S
vf/xf à vf+

135,00 



CLAUDIUS, 41-54 - AE Sestertius, Rome (41-42)

weight 25,32gr. ; Ø 31mm.

obv. Laureate head of Claudius right TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG PM TR P IMP
rev. Spes advancing left, holding flower and lifting skirt  SPES AVGVSTA S C

Cohen 85 ; RIC 99 ; BMC 124 ; Sear 1853
Very attractive coin with good portrat and excellent details. Tiber patina.
vf+/xf-

1.750,00 



CLAUDIUS, 41-54 - AE As, Rome (41-42)

weight 8,95gr. ; copper Ø 24,5mm.

obv. Bare head of Claudius left, around the text;
TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG PM TR P IMP
rev. Minerva advancing right, brandishing spear and holding shield,
S - C across field

Cohen 84var. ; RIC 100 ; BMC 149 ; Sear 1861
Very short flan. Impressive portrait. Dark patina.
vf

195,00 



CLAUDIUS, 41-54 - AE As, Rome (41-42)

weight 13,25gr. ; copper Ø 27mm.

obv. Bare head of Claudius left, around the text;
TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG PM TR P IMP
rev. Minerva advancing right, brandishing spear and holding shield,
S - C across field

Cohen 84var. ; RIC 100 ; BMC 149 ; Sear 1861
good portrait
vf-/f+

145,00 



CLAUDIUS, 41-54 - AE As, Rome (42)

weight 9,63gr. ; copper Ø 28,5mm.

obv. Bare head left  TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG PM TR P IMP P P
rev. Minerva advancing right, brandishing spear and holding shield  S C

Cohen 84 ; RIC 116 ; BMC 206 ; Sear 1862
Minor traces of oxidation. Attractive dark green patina.
vf

185,00 



CLAUDIUS, 41-54 - AE Sestertius, Rome (41-42)

weight 17,69gr. ; Ø 32mm.

obv. Head right  TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG PM TR P IMP PP
rev. Spes walking left  SPES AVGVSTA S C

ref.Cohen 85 ; RIC 99 ; BMC 124
Short flan. Dark patina.
vf- à f/vf

335,00 



CLAUDIUS, 41-54 - AE Sestertius, Rome (80)

weight 25,50gr. ; bronze Ø 35mm.
Restauration issue, struck during the reign of Titus (79 - 81).

obv. Laurated head right  TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG PM TR P IMP PP
rev. Spes advancing left, holding flower  IMP T VESP AVG REST S C

Cohen 103 : RIC 475 ; BMC 297 RR
vf-

1.195,00 



CLAUDIUS, 41-54 - CILICIA, MOPSOUESTIA - Diassarion, Mopsos , year 5 (49/50 ?)

weight 14,89gr. ; bronze Ø 28mm.

obv. Bare head of Claudius to right, around the text;
TIBЄPIOC KΛΑΥΔΙΟC KAICAP
rev. Zeus seated left with patera and sceptre, KAICAPE(ΩΝ) on right,
ETOY  E in upper left field

This issue has variously been attributed to a Caesarea in Cappadocia, Cilicia and Syria. Recently, Tahberer (in NC 175 (2015), pp. 47-55) has argued that these coins should be attributed to Mopsos instead, which, for unknown reasons, renamed itself to Caesarea between 45/6 and 50/1. RPC listed only 2 specimens of this coin type. Extremely rare.

SNG. von Aulock 6349 ; RPC I 4085 RRRR
vf- /f+

750,00 



CLAUDIUS, 41-54 - EGYPTE, ALEXANDRIA - AE Diobol, jr. 12 (51-52 AD)

weight 8,39gr. ; bronze 24,5mm.

obv. Laureate head of Claudius right
TI KΛAY KAI CEBAC ΣAP ΓEPMA
rev. Eagle standing right on thunderbolt, head turned to left,
L - IB across field, AYTO KPA

Milne 123 ; RPC.5187 ; Dattari 155 ; SNG.Copenhagen 81 ; 
SNG.Paris 239 ;
Slg. Köln 103 ; Förschner- (cf. 74) ; Sear- (cf. 1877)

f+/vf-

135,00 



CLAUDIUS, 41-54 - EGYPTE, ALEXANDRIA - AE Diobol, jr. 13 (52-53 AD)

weight 9,79gr. ; bronze 24mm.

obv. Laureate head of Claudius right
TI KΛAY KAI CEBAC ΣAP ΓEPMA
rev. Eagle standing right on thunderbolt, head turned to left,
L - IΓ across field, AYTO KPA

BMC 92 ; RPC.5193 ; Dattari 156 ; SNG.Copenhagen 83 ;
Milne 128 ; Slg. Köln 105 ; Förschner 74 ; SNG.Paris 242 ; Sear 1877

f

50,00 



CLAUDIUS & NERO CAESAR - AV Aureus, Rome (51)

weight 7,50gr. ; gold Ø 19mm.

obv. Laureate head of Claudius right
TI CLAVD CAESAR AVG GERM P M TRIB POT PP
rev. Bare-headed and draped bust of young Nero left
NERO CLAVD CAES DRVSVS GERM PRINC IVVENT

Cohen - (cf.4) ; RIC 82 ; BMC 79 ; Von Kaenel 1081 ; Calicó 391 RR
(cf. Ars Classica auction 91, no. 8 in vf  with scratches and edge nicks ; CHF 12.000 + 20%)
Minor weak part near edge, otherwise very attractive and very rare coin with good portraits.
vf/xf-

14.500,00 



GERMANICUS, brother of Claudius - AE As, Rome (50-54)

weight 10,90gr. ; copper Ø 28mm.

obv. Bare head right  GERMANICVS CAESAR TI AVG F DIVI AVG N
rev. TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG GERM PM TR P IMP PP around large S C

The asses struck during the reign of Claudius are much scarcer
then the asses struck during the reign of Caligula.

Cohen 9 ; RIC 106 ; BMC 215 ; Sear 1905
Minor graffiti “X” on reverse.
Wonderful coin of good style and with dark brown patina. Rare this nice.
vf/xf à xf-

1.350,00 



GERMANICUS, brother of Claudius - LYDIA, SARDES - MNASEAS, magistrate - AE 14 (41-54 AD)

weight 3,49gr. ; bronze Ø 14mm.

obv. Bare head of Claudius left  KAIΣAP  ΓEPMANIKOΣ
rev. Pallas Athena standing left, holding phiale, spear and shield
ΣAPΔIANΩN  MNAΣEAΣ

Although the portrait on this coin is always described as that of Germanicus
in the literature, it is clearly the portrait of his brother Claudius.

Mnaseas was probably a strategos, a military leader.

BMC 113 ; RPC.2993 ; SNG.Copenhagen- ;
Weber collection 6909 ; Sear GIC.357 R
Very attractive coin of good style and with dark patina.
vf+

275,00 



GERMANICUS, brother of Claudius - LYDIA, SARDES - MNASEAS, magistrate - AE 13 (41-54 AD)

weight 3,49gr. ; bronze Ø 14mm.
Mnaseas was probably a strategos, a military leader.

obv. Bare head of Claudius left  KAIΣAP  ΓEPMANIKOΣ
rev. Pallas Athena standing left, holding phiale, spear and shield
ΣAPΔIANΩN  MNAΣEAΣ

Although the portrait on this coin is always described as that of Germanicus
in the literature, it is clearly the portrait of his brother Claudius.


BMC 113 ; RPC.2993 ; SNG.Copenhagen- ;
Weber collection 6909 ; Sear GIC.357
R
Struck on a short, thick flan. Dark patina. Rare.
vf-

135,00 



NERO CLAUDIUS DRUSUS, father of Claudius - AR Denarius , Lugdunum (41-42 AD)

weight 3,55gr. ; silver Ø 18mm.

obv. Laureate head of Nero Claudius Drusus left
NERO CLAVDIVS DRVSVS GERMANICVS IMP
rev. Triumphal arch surmounted by equestrian statue,
left, between two trophies, rider extends right hand,
DE GERMANIS on architrave

This coin was minted to celebrate the erection of the arch monument, which was build to commemorate the success of Roman arms in Germany led by Nero Claudius Drusus. Very rare.

Nero Claudius Drusus was the stepson of Augustus and the younger brother of Tiberius: he was the father of Claudius and Germanicus, and the grandfather of Caligula.

Nero Claudius Drusus Germanicus was born 38 BC, shortly after the divorce of his mother, Livia Drusilla, from Tiberius Claudius Nero; she immediately married Octavian (later Augustus), who was suspected of being Drusus′ real father. Like his brother, Drusus was allowed to seek office five years before the legally specified age. He became praetor (magistrate) in 11 and consul in 9. With Tiberius he fought against two Alpine tribes (the Raeti and Vindelici), and in 13 he was made governor of the three Gauls. In this office he carried out an important census and erected the altar of Augustus at Lugdunum (now Lyon).

In 12–9 BC he led expeditions into Germany, establishing bases, first at Vetera (at the junction of the Lippe and Rhine rivers) and then at Mogontiacum (now Mainz). The Frisii, Chauci, Cherusci, and Chatti tribes were subdued, and a canal, the Fossa Drusiana, was dug from the Rhine to the North Sea. In the year 9, Drusus reached the Elbe River, but he was thrown from his horse and died of the injuries 30 days later. He was posthumously given the cognomen Germanicus. Drusus′ conquests were extensive, but most were lost when Arminius defeated Publius Quinctilius Varus in the Battle of the Teutoburg Forest (AD 9). It was believed that Drusus desired the restoration of the republic, and his eldest son, Germanicus, was a popular favourite. Drusus had married, about 16 BC, the younger Antonia, daughter of Mark Antony and Octavia. Their surviving children, besides Germanicus, were Livilla and Claudius, who later became emperor.


Cohen 4 ; RIC 72 ; BMC 101 ; Sear 1894 RR
Very minor traces of oxidation.
vf/vf-

1.695,00 



NERO CLAUDIUS DRUSUS, father of Claudius - AE Sestertius, Rome (41-42 AD)

weight 25,77gr. ; orichalcum Ø 34mm.

obv. Bare head of Nero Claudius Drusus left
NERO CLAVDIVS DRVSVS GERMANICVS IMP
rev. Claudius, bare-headed and togate, seated left on curule chair,
holding branch in his right hand and resting his left on his lap;
around the chair, spears, shields, cuirass, and a helmet, below S C,
surrounded by the legend; TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR P IMP 

This remarkable sestertius is part of a series of bronze coins
issued by Claudius to celebrate his father′s military triumphs.


Nero Claudius Drusus was the stepson of Augustus and the younger brother of Tiberius: he was the father of Claudius and Germanicus, and the grandfather of Caligula.

Nero Claudius Drusus Germanicus was born 38 BC, shortly after the divorce of his mother, Livia Drusilla, from Tiberius Claudius Nero; she immediately married Octavian (later Augustus), who was suspected of being Drusus′ real father. Like his brother, Drusus was allowed to seek office five years before the legally specified age. He became praetor (magistrate) in 11 and consul in 9. With Tiberius he fought against two Alpine tribes (the Raeti and Vindelici), and in 13 he was made governor of the three Gauls. In this office he carried out an important census and erected the altar of Augustus at Lugdunum (now Lyon).

In 12–9 BC he led expeditions into Germany, establishing bases, first at Vetera (at the junction of the Lippe and Rhine rivers) and then at Mogontiacum (now Mainz). The Frisii, Chauci, Cherusci, and Chatti tribes were subdued, and a canal, the Fossa Drusiana, was dug from the Rhine to the North Sea. In the year 9, Drusus reached the Elbe River, but he was thrown from his horse and died of the injuries 30 days later. He was posthumously given the cognomen Germanicus. Drusus′ conquests were extensive, but most were lost when Arminius defeated Publius Quinctilius Varus in the Battle of the Teutoburg Forest (AD 9). It was believed that Drusus desired the restoration of the republic, and his eldest son, Germanicus, was a popular favourite. Drusus had married, about 16 BC, the younger Antonia, daughter of Mark Antony and Octavia. Their surviving children, besides Germanicus, were Livilla and Claudius, who later became emperor.

Cohen 8 ; RIC 93 ; BMC 157 ; Sear 1896 R
Very attractive detailed portrait of fine style.
vf

1.895,00 



NERO CLAUDIUS DRUSUS, father of Claudius - AE Sestertius, Rome (41-42)

weight 26,67gr. ; orichalcum Ø 34mm.

obv. Bare head of Nero Claudius Drusus left
NERO CLAVDIVS DRVSVS GERMANICVS IMP
rev. Claudius, bare-headed and togate, seated left on curule chair,
holding branch in his right hand and resting his left on his lap;
around the chair, spears, shields, cuirass, and a helmet, below S C,
around the text; TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR P IMP PP

Nero Claudius Drusus was the stepson of Augustus and the younger brother of Tiberius: he was the father of Claudius and Germanicus, and the grandfather of Caligula.

Nero Claudius Drusus Germanicus was born 38 BC, shortly after the divorce of his mother, Livia Drusilla, from Tiberius Claudius Nero; she immediately married Octavian (later Augustus), who was suspected of being Drusus′ real father. Like his brother, Drusus was allowed to seek office five years before the legally specified age. He became praetor (magistrate) in 11 and consul in 9. With Tiberius he fought against two Alpine tribes (the Raeti and Vindelici), and in 13 he was made governor of the three Gauls. In this office he carried out an important census and erected the altar of Augustus at Lugdunum (now Lyon).

In 12–9 BC he led expeditions into Germany, establishing bases, first at Vetera (at the junction of the Lippe and Rhine rivers) and then at Mogontiacum (now Mainz). The Frisii, Chauci, Cherusci, and Chatti tribes were subdued, and a canal, the Fossa Drusiana, was dug from the Rhine to the North Sea. In the year 9, Drusus reached the Elbe River, but he was thrown from his horse and died of the injuries 30 days later. He was posthumously given the cognomen Germanicus. Drusus′ conquests were extensive, but most were lost when Arminius defeated Publius Quinctilius Varus in the Battle of the Teutoburg Forest (AD 9). It was believed that Drusus desired the restoration of the republic, and his eldest son, Germanicus, was a popular favourite. Drusus had married, about 16 BC, the younger Antonia, daughter of Mark Antony and Octavia. Their surviving children, besides Germanicus, were Livilla and Claudius, who later became emperor.

Cohen 8 ; RIC 109 ; BMC 208 ; Sear 1897 R
vf-

1.550,00 



ANTONIA, mother of Claudius - AR Denarius, Lugdunum (41-42)

weight 3,45gr. ; silver Ø 18mm.

obv. Draped bust of Antonia right, wreathed with corn-ears,
surrounded by the legend; ANTONIA AVGVSTA
rev. Ceres standing facing, holding long torch and cornucopiae 
CONSTANTIAE AVGVSTI

Antonia was the wife of Nero Claudius Drusus and mother of Claudius.
Very rare.

Cohen 1 ; RIC 66 ; BMC 111 ; Sear 1900 RR
Some minor roughness, but very attractive coin with fine-detailed portrait.
vf

1.950,00 



ANTONIA, mother of Claudius - AV Aureus, Lugdunum (41-42)

weight 7,77gr. ; gold Ø 19mm.

obv. Draped bust right, wearing crown of corn-ears, hair in long plait behind
ANTONIA behind, AVGVSTA before
rev. Two vertical long lit torches, lighted and linked by pelleted ribbon,
surrounded by the legend; SACERDOS DIVI AVGVTI

This coin bears the posthumous representation of Antonia Minor, and was struck in her memory by her son Claudius upon his ascension to the throne. This well liked and respected Roman woman who was celebrated for her virtue and beauty was the younger of the two daughters of Marc Antony and Octavia, who after Antony′s death was allowed by Augustus to benefit from her father′s estate. She thus became wealthy and influential, and married Nero Claudius Drusus, general and consul, bearing him several children. Three survived into adulthood: the popular Germanicus, the future emperor Claudius, and a daughter Livilla. Following the death of her husband in AD 9 whilst on campaign in Germania, the rest of Antonia′s life was plagued by ill fortune as she outlived her eldest son, her daughter and several of her grandchildren.

After first the death of her husband, her eldest son Germanicus died in AD 19 in mysterious circumstances in Asia, where he incorporated the kingdoms of Commagene and Cappadocia into Roman provinces. While feuding with the governor of Syria Gnaeus Calpurnius Piso, Germanicus was thought to have been poisoned, either by Piso or by Tiberius′ scheming advisor Sejanus. Her younger son Claudius, who was born with severe disabilities, was ostracised by his family and excluded from public office until his consulship in AD 37 which he shared with his nephew Caligula. Ironically, this action by his family may have actually saved his life as he was not perceived as a threat to power and therefore survived the purges of Tiberius′ and Caligula′s reigns, going on to prove himself a worthy emperor.

Antonia′s woes did not stop with her sons, as her daughter Livilla is supposed to have poisoned her husband Drusus the Younger, son of Tiberius. According to Cassius Dio, Tiberius handed Livilla over to her mother, who locked her up in a room and starved her to death. After the death of Tiberius, her grandson Caligula became emperor, and though Antonia would often offer him advice, he once told her, ′I can treat anyone exactly as I please!′ Caligula was rumoured to have had his young cousin Gemellus beheaded, to remove him as a rival to the throne. This act was said to have outraged Antonia, who was grandmother to Gemellus as well as to Caligula. Able to stand no more of Caligula′s tyranny, Antonia committed suicide, though Suetonius (Lives of the Caesars IV.23), suggests she might also have been poisoned by her grandson. Despite what must have been a painful childhood, rejected by his own mother, Claudius clearly idolised her and after his accession gave her the posthumous title of Augusta, and her birthday became a public holiday which was marked with yearly games and public sacrifices, and her image was paraded in a carriage. After Livia, wife of Augustus, Antonia the Younger was the first lady of the imperial family to be named Augusta.

The portrait of this coin depict Antonia Augusta as Ceres / Demeter, mother-goddess of the harvest, wearing a crown of grain ears. The reverse legend, sacerdis divi avgvsti, presents Claudius′ mother as ″Priestess of the Divine August″ (Augustus was her uncle), and the coin shows two lit torches linked by a ribbon (or a garland?). The fact that there are two torches could reflect the duality of the two Augustae, and they probably refer to the cult of Augustus. Claudius particularly liked rituals and cults, even trying to relocate the Eleusinian Mysteries from Attica to Rome (Suetonius Claudius 25). The coin also evokes the nocturnal rites of Ceres, whose visits to the underworld were illuminated by torches, as her cult was popular in Rome, and involved annual celebrations (the Cerealia) and games (the Ludi Cereales) which were obviously a good occasion for the emperor to be liked by his subjects.

Cohen 4 ; RIC 67 ; BMC 112 ; Calicó 319  ; 
cf. von Kaenel 350 ; Sear 1899
RR
(cf. Maison Palombo Genève, auction 17, lot 44 xf+: SFR 50.000 + 20%)
Attractive example with fine details. Very rare.
vf/xf à xf-

23.500,00 



ANTONIA, mother of Claudius - AR Denarius, Rome (41-42)

weight 3,80gr. ; silver Ø 18mm.
Antonia was the wife of Nero Claudius Drusus and mother of Claudius

obv. Draped bust right, wearing crown of corn-ears, hair in long plait behind
ANTONIA AVGVSTA
rev. Two vertical long lit torches, lighted and linked by pelleted ribbon
SACERDOS DIVI AVGVSTI

This coin bears the posthumous representation of Antonia Minor, and was struck in her memory by her son Claudius upon his ascension to the throne. This well liked and respected Roman woman who was celebrated for her virtue and beauty was the younger of the two daughters of Marc Antony and Octavia, who after Antony′s death was allowed by Augustus to benefit from her father′s estate. She thus became wealthy and influential, and married Nero Claudius Drusus, general and consul, bearing him several children. Three survived into adulthood: the popular Germanicus, the future emperor Claudius, and a daughter Livilla. Following the death of her husband in AD 9 whilst on campaign in Germania, the rest of Antonia′s life was plagued by ill fortune as she outlived her eldest son, her daughter and several of her grandchildren.

After first the death of her husband, her eldest son Germanicus died in AD 19 in mysterious circumstances in Asia, where he incorporated the kingdoms of Commagene and Cappadocia into Roman provinces. While feuding with the governor of Syria Gnaeus Calpurnius Piso, Germanicus was thought to have been poisoned, either by Piso or by Tiberius′ scheming advisor Sejanus. Her younger son Claudius, who was born with severe disabilities, was ostracised by his family and excluded from public office until his consulship in AD 37 which he shared with his nephew Caligula. Ironically, this action by his family may have actually saved his life as he was not perceived as a threat to power and therefore survived the purges of Tiberius′ and Caligula′s reigns, going on to prove himself a worthy emperor.

Antonia′s woes did not stop with her sons, as her daughter Livilla is supposed to have poisoned her husband Drusus the Younger, son of Tiberius. According to Cassius Dio, Tiberius handed Livilla over to her mother, who locked her up in a room and starved her to death. After the death of Tiberius, her grandson Caligula became emperor, and though Antonia would often offer him advice, he once told her, ′I can treat anyone exactly as I please!′
Caligula was rumoured to have had his young cousin Gemellus beheaded, to remove him as a rival to the throne. This act was said to have outraged Antonia, who was grandmother to Gemellus as well as to Caligula. Able to stand no more of Caligula′s tyranny, Antonia committed suicide, though Suetonius (Lives of the Caesars IV.23) , suggests she might also have been poisoned by her grandson.
Despite what must have been a painful childhood, rejected by his own mother, Claudius clearly idolised her and after his accession gave her the posthumous title of Augusta, and her birthday became a public holiday which was marked with yearly games and public sacrifices, and her image was paraded in a carriage.

Cohen 5 ; RIC 68 ; BMC 114 ; Sear 1901 RR
Very attractive and  rare coin with beautiful toning..
vf/xf à xf-

4.750,00 



ANTONIA, mother of Claudius (41-54) - AE Dupondius, Rome (41-42)

weight 13,19gr. ; bronze Ø 27mm.

obv. Draped bust right  ANTONIA AVGVSTA
rev. Claudius in toga standing left, holding simpulum
TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG PM TR P IMP S C

Cohen 6 ; RIC 92 ; BMC 166 R
wonderful portrait and very attractive dark patina
vf+ à vf/xf

895,00 



NERO as Caesar, 50-54 - AR Cistophorus, Ephesos (51)

weight 10,63gr. ; silver Ø 26mm.

obv. Draped bust of young Nero left, with bare head 
NERONI CLAVD CAES DRVSO GERM
rev. Shield with inscription COS DESIG / PRINCI / IVVENT
encircled by laurel-wreath

Cohen 82 ; RIC 121(R3) ; RPC 2225 ; BMC 236 ; Sear 1919 RR
vf-/vf

2.250,00 



NERO as caesar, 50-54 - AR Denarius, Lugdunum (51)

weight 3,43gr. ; silver Ø 18mm.

obv. Draped, bare headed, bust of young Nero right, surrounded 
by the legend; NERONI CLAVDIO DRVSO GERM COS DESIGN
rev. Shield with inscription; EQVESTER / OR - DO / PRINCIPI / IVVENT,
vertical spear behind

Cohen 97 ; RIC 79 ; BMC 93 ; Sear 1918 RR
Very minor traces of oxidation. Wonderful portrait of the young Prince Nero
xf-/vf+

1.650,00 



NERO as Caesar, 50-54 - AV Aureus, Lugdunum (51)

weight 7,59gr. ; silver Ø 19mm.

obv. Bust of Nero, bare-headed, draped, left, surrounded 
by the legend; NERO CLAVD CAES DRVSVS GERM PRINC IVVENT
translation: Nero Claudius Caesar Drusus Germanicus Principes Juventutis =
Nero Claudius Caesar Drusus, conqueror of the Germans, prince of youth.
rev. Simpulum above tripod and lituus above patera, surrounded by the legend;
SACERD COOPT IN OMN CONL SVPRA NVM EX S C
translation: Sacerdos Cooptatus In Omnia Collegia Supra Numerum Ex Senatus
Consultum = Supernumerary priest elected in all the colleges by decree of the senate.

Nero, adopted by Claudius in AD 50. His mother Agrippina was behind Nero first being raised to the rank of Princeps Iuventutis (Leader of Youth) in 51 AD. Nero now appears on the coinage, as the official heir and not Britannicus, the son of Claudius.

On the reverse of this coin we see a ′simpulum′ (sacrificial ladle), a tripod, a ′lituus′ (augures staff) and a ′patera′ (libation bowl). These symbols symbolize the 4 main priest colleges of Rome :Pontifices, Quindecimviri Sacris Faciundis, Augures & Epulones. Nero was appointed by Senatorial decree as a supernumerary priest into these 4 collleges after adopting the toga virilis (white toga of manhood) in 51

provenance; ex. Schulman pricelist 211, lot 54 ; ex. auction Dr. Eugen Merzbacher Nachf.,
15 Nov.1910, lot 1449 → ex. Auction Sotheby, Wilkinson & Hodge, 24 February 1909,
lot 20 → ex. conseiller M. de Montcara collection (18th century).


Cohen 311 ; RIC 76 (R2) ; BMC 84 ; von Kaenel Type 52 ;
Biaggi 240 ; Calicó 441 ; Sear 1915 
RR
(cf. NAC, auction 54 in xf/unc with weakness and scuff; SFR 24.000 + 16,5%)
Reverse light off-centred en minor scratch, nevertheless a very attractive coin
with a magnificent portrait of the young Prince Nero. Very rare.
xf/xf-

14.500,00 



NERO as Caesar, 50-54 - SYRIA - AR Didrachm, Antiochia ad Orontem (51-54)

weight 4,05gr. ; silver Ø 18mm.

obv. Bust of Nero, bare-headed, draped, right, surrounded 
by the legend; NЄPωNOC KAICAPOC ΓЄPMANIKOY
rev. Simpulum and lituus, surrounded by the legend; 
ΔIΔΡAXMON

Nero, adopted by Claudius in AD 50. His mother Agrippina was behind Nero first being raised to the rank of Princeps Iuventutis (Leader of Youth) in 51 AD. Nero now appears on the coinage, as the official heir and not Britannicus, the son of Claudius.

On the reverse of this coin we see a ′simpulum′ (sacrificial ladle) and a ′lituus′ (augures staff). These symbols symbolize 2 of the the 4 main priest colleges of Rome :Pontifices, Quindecimviri Sacris Faciundis, Augures & Epulones. Nero was appointed by Senatorial decree as a supernumerary priest into these 4 collleges after adopting the toga virilis (white toga of manhood) in 51.

This is one of very few ancient coins to explicitly
mention the denomination on the reverse.

BMC 209 ; SNG.Copenhagen 375 ; RPC.4171 ; McAlee 272 RR
Well-centred example of this very rare coin type. 
vf à vf/xf

1.750,00 



NERO, 54-68 - AE Sestertius, Rome (64)

weight 26,15gr. ; orichalcum Ø 33mm.

obv. Head of Nero, laureate, right, aegis on chest, surrounded by the legend;
NERO CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG GER PM TR P IMP PP
rev. Nero, bare-headed, cuirassed, cloak flying behind, prancing right on horseback,
mounted soldier riding left, S - C across fields, DECVRSIO in exergue

Cohen 83 ; RIC 170 ; BMC 143 ; Sear 1957  R
f/vf

695,00 



NERO, 54-68 - AV Aureus, Rome (65-66)

weight 7,28gr. ; goud Ø 19mm.

obv. Laureate head right  NERO CAESAR AVGVSTVS
rev. Temple of Janus with closed doors
IANVM CLVSIT PACE P R TERRA MARIQ PARTA

In ancient Rome, the main Temple of Janus stood in the Forum Romanum near the Argiletum. It had doors on both ends, and inside was a statue of Janus, the two-faced god of boundaries. The temple doors (the ″Gates of Janus″) were closed in times of peace and opened in times of war.
The Temple of Janus was Numa′s (2nd King of Rome) most famous temple project, which he built to distract the early warlike Romans from their violent ways. During Numa′s reign, the gates of the Temple of Janus were closed and Rome remained at peace (as shown on the reverse of this Coin).

The next king, Tullus Hostilius, opened the Gates of Janus when he went to war with Alba Longa. The Gates of Janus remained open for the next 400 years until after the First Punic War when T. Manlius Torquatus closed the Gates of Janus in 235 BC. This closure lasted about eight years. War with the Gauls in Northern Italy forced the Gates of Janus to reopen. They did not close again until 29 BC, following the deaths of Marc Anthony and Cleopatra (when Augustus had overthrown Marc Anthony).

On the rare occasions when Rome was not at war with a foreign enemy, the doors of the ″Twin Janus″ were ceremonially closed, an event which Nero commemorated extensively on the coinage of 65-67 AD. On this aureus we see a curious rectangular structure, the precise location of which remains uncertain, consisted of two arched gateways joined by walls though lacking a roof.

Cohen 114 ; RIC 58 ; BMC 64 ; Calicó 409 ; Sear 1929 R
Rare historical coin with attractive depiction of the Temple of Janus.
f/vf à vf-

4.350,00 



NERO, 54-68 - AR Denarius, Rome (66-67)

weight 3,42gr. ; silver Ø 18mm.

obv. Laurated head right  IMP NERO CAESAR AVGVSTVS
rev. Jupiter seated left, holding thunderbolt and scepter  IVPPITER CVSTOS

Cohen 121 ; RIC 64 (R3) ; BMC- (cf. 77) ; cf. Sear 1943 RR
vf/vf-

525,00 



NERO, 54-68 - AE Dupondius, Lugdunum (circa 65)

weight 14,29gr. ; bronze Ø 30mm.

obv. Laureate head left, small globe at the point of the truncaton
NERO CLAVD CAESAR AVG GER P M TR P IMP P
rev. Front view of Nero′s two-stroreyed provision-market, showing domed
central section approached by steps and containing statue, flanked by wings,
MAG to left, AVG to right, S C below

The Great Provision-Market (Macellum Magnum) on Rome′s Caelian Hill was
completed in AD 59. Part of it was transformed into the church of S. Stefano Rotundo
by Pope Simplicius at about the time of the fall of the Western Empire.

cf. Cohen 129 ; RIC 400 ; cf. BMC 336 ; cf. Price & Trell 102 R
Minor traces of oxidation. Interesting and rare coin.
vf-

1.100,00 



NERO, 54-68 - AE Sestertius, Rome (circa 65)

weight 27,03gr. ; orichalcum Ø 34,5mm.

obv. Laureate head of Nero right, aegis on chest, surrounded by the legend;
NERO CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG GER PM TR P IMP P P 
rev. Temple of Janus, with latticed window to right and double doors to left
with garland hung across (′terra door′), surrounded by the legend;
PACE P R TERRA MARIQ PARTA IANVM CLVSIT, S - C across field

The Temple of Janus stood in the Roman Forum near the Basilica Aemilia, along the Argiletum. It was a small temple with a statue of Janus, the two-faced god of boundaries and beginnings inside. Its doors were known as the ″Gates of Janus″, which were closed in times of peace and opened in times of war. In the early stages of the city of Rome, the inhabitants lived in separate walled villas. The Janus was the gate from the Forum to the rest of the Rome as originally the Forum was the courtyard of the king′s villa. The Gates themselves were the main purpose for the Temple of Janus. There are different theries why the doors were closed at times of peace. There is lack of clarity by the Romans themselves, but it is believed that in time of peace, Janus or peace itself is kept in the temple locked into the temple. It was very symbolic. However, a Roman viewed the Temple of Janus′s gates having them shut was a time of celebration and of pride for the rulers of Rome.

During Numa′s reign, the Gates of Janus were closed as Rome was at peace. The next king, Tullus Hostilius, opened the Gates of Janus when he went to war with Alba Longa. The Gates of Janus remained open for the next 400 years until after the First Punic War when A. Manlius Torquatus closed the Gates of Janus in 241 BC.  War with the Gauls in Northern Italy forced the Gates of Janus to reopen. They did not close again until 29 BC, following the deaths of Antony and Cleopatra. During the reign of Augustus the doors were closed three times. Later emperors also closed the Gates of the Janus to great fanfare. The most famous closures occurred under Nero and Vespasian. Nero minted a large series of coins with the Ara Pacis, and the Janus itself with closed gates on the reverse to commemorate this event. The sestertius offerened here is a beautiful example of these coins.

Variety with MARQ instead of the correct MARIQ.
Seems to be unpublished in the standard literature.

Wonderful sestertius with magnificent characteristic portrait of Nero of masterly style and an exceptionally detailed reverse composition. Attractive green patina. Very rare.

cf. NAC, auction 131, Lot 12 in good xf  (SFR 65.000 + 22%)

Cohen 134var .; RIC 270var. ; BMC 164var. ;
cf. Mac Donald, Nero 140 ; cf. Sear 1958
RR
xf-/xf

17.500,00 



NERO, 54-68 - AE Sestertius, Rome (circa 65)

weight 24,70gr. ; orichalcum Ø 32,5mm.

obv. Laureate head of Nero right, aegis on chest, surrounded by the legend;
NERO CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG GER PM TR P IMP P P
rev. Temple of Janus, with latticed window to right and double doors to left
with garland hung across (′terra door′), surrounded by the legend;
PACE P R TERRA MARIQ PARTA IANVM CLVSIT, S - C across field

The Temple of Janus stood in the Roman Forum near the Basilica Aemilia, along the Argiletum. It was a small temple with a statue of Janus, the two-faced god of boundaries and beginnings inside. Its doors were known as the ″Gates of Janus″, which were closed in times of peace and opened in times of war. In the early stages of the city of Rome, the inhabitants lived in separate walled villas. The Janus was the gate from the Forum to the rest of the Rome as originally the Forum was the courtyard of the king′s villa. The Gates themselves were the main purpose for the Temple of Janus. There are different theries why the doors were closed at times of peace. There is lack of clarity by the Romans themselves, but it is believed that in time of peace, Janus or peace itself is kept in the temple locked into the temple. It was very symbolic. However, a Roman viewed the Temple of Janus′s gates having them shut was a time of celebration and of pride for the rulers of Rome.

During Numa′s reign, the Gates of Janus were closed as Rome was at peace. The next king, Tullus Hostilius, opened the Gates of Janus when he went to war with Alba Longa. The Gates of Janus remained open for the next 400 years until after the First Punic War when A. Manlius Torquatus closed the Gates of Janus in 241 BC.  War with the Gauls in Northern Italy forced the Gates of Janus to reopen. They did not close again until 29 BC, following the deaths of Antony and Cleopatra. During the reign of Augustus the doors were closed three times. Later emperors also closed the Gates of the Janus to great fanfare. The most famous closures occurred under Nero and Vespasian. Nero minted a large series of coins with the Ara Pacis, and the Janus itself with closed gates on the reverse to commemorate this event. The sestertius offerened here is an example of these coins.

Cohen 154 ; RIC 270 ; BMC 161 ; cf. Sear 1957 R
f/vf

695,00 



NERO, 54-68 - AR Denarius, Lugdunum (55)

weight 3,68gr. ; silver Ø 17,5mm.

obv. Bare head right  NERO CAESAR AVG IMP
rev. EX S C within wreath, around PONTIF•MAX• TR•P•III•P•P•

Cohen 207 ; RIC 12 ; BMC 14  ; Sear- (cf.1936) RR
This very rare cointype, of the young emperor Nero, is hard to find in this high grade quality.
xf-

3.250,00 



NERO, 54-68 - AR Denarius, Lugdunum (60-61)

weight 3,38gr. ; silver Ø 18,5mm.

obv. Bare head right, surrounded by the legend;
NERO CAESAR AVG IMP

rev. EX S C within wreath, surrounded by the legend;
PONTIF•MAX•TR•P•VII•COS•IIII•P•P•

Cohen 216 ; RIC 22 (R3) ; BMC 24  ; Sear 1936 RR
Very rare cointype, of the young emperor Nero.
Some minor scrathes though still an attractive coin with appealing patina.

about vf

895,00 



NERO, 54-68 - AV Aureus, Lugdunum (60-61)

weight 7,62gr. ; gold Ø 18,5mm.

obv. Bare head right NERO • CAESAR • AVG IMP
rev. Ceres, veled and draped, standing left, holding corn-ears and long
scepter  PONTIF•MAX• TR•P VII•COS•IIII•PP, in field EX - SC

Cohen 217 ; RIC 23 ; BMC 25 ; Sear 1923 ; Calicó 428 RR
about vf

5.950,00 



NERO, 54-68 - AV Aureus, Rome (61-62)

weight 7,69gr. ; gold Ø 19mm.

obv. Bare head of Nero right  NERO•CAESAR•AVG•IMP
rev. Roma standing right, left foor on arms, inscribing shield set on
left knee PONTIF•MAX•TR•P• VIII•COS•IIII•PP, in field EX – SC

Very minor scratch on the reverse. Very rare coin type, especially this nice. 
Sear 1924var. ; Cohen 227 ; RIC 33(R3) ; BMC 36 ; Calicó 433 RR
xf-

11.950,00 



NERO, 54-68 - AE Sestertius, Rome (65)

weight 25,70gr. ; orichalcum Ø 35mm.

obv. Head of Nero, laureate, right; aegis on chest
IMP NERO CAESAR AVG P MAX TR POT P P
rev. Roma, helmeted, in military dress, seated left on cuirass, holding Victory
in right hand and resting left on parazonium: behind cuirass two round shields
and one oblong, S - C across fields, ROMA in exergue

Cohen 278 ; RIC 273 ; BMC 173 ; cf. Sear 1961
Wonderful fine-detailed portrait coin of Nero.
xf-/vf+

2.950,00 



NERO, 54-68 - AE Sestertius, Rome (65)

weight 25,79gr. ; orichalcum Ø 34mm.

obv. Head of Nero, laureate, right; aegis on chest
IMP NERO CAESAR AVG P MAX TR POT P P
rev. Roma, helmeted, in military dress, seated left on cuirass,
holding Victory in right hand and resting left on parazonium:
behind cuirass two round shields and one oblong,
S - C across fields, ROMA in exergue

Cohen 278 ; RIC 273 ; BMC 173 ; cf. Sear 1961
vf

1.150,00 



NERO, 54-68 - AE As, Lugdunum (66)

weight 10,27gr. ; copper Ø 30mm.

obv. Head of Nero, bare, right; globe at point of bust
IMP NERO CAESAR AVG P MAX TR PP P
rev. Victory, winged, draped, moving left, holding in both
hands shield inscribed S P Q R, S - C across fields

Cohen 302 ; RIC 543 and 605 ; BMC 381 ; McDowald, Nero 593 and 602
Choice portrait, bold and well struck. Handsome dark patina.
Rare in this high state of preservation.
xf-

895,00 



NERO, 54-68 - LYDIA, PHILADELPHIA - AE 17, circa 54-59 AD

weight 3,72gr. ; bronze Ø 17mm.

obv. Draped bust of young Nero, bare, right, within dotted circle
rev. Hekate, standing facing, wearing kalathos and holding long torches,
within dotted circle

Normally this coin type has legends on both sides. On this coin there is no legend at all.
Because of the primitive style, this may be a contemporary imitation. Very rare.

BMC- ; SNG.Copenhagen- ; SNG.von Aulock- ;
Weber collection - ; RPC.- (cf. 3041)
RR
f+ à f/vf

80,00 



NERO, 54-68 AD - PHRYGIA, APAMEIA - M. VETTIOS NIGROS - AE 18, 54-59

weight 5,87gr. ; bronze Ø 18mm.

obv. Draped bust of young Nero, bare, right
NEPΩN ΣEBAΣTOΣ
rev. Marsyas, standing right, playing aulos (flute), ΕΠΙ Μ ΟΥΕΤΤΙΟΥ
ΝΙΓΡΟΥ before, ΚΟΙΝΟΝ ΦΡΥΓΙΑΣ ΑΠΑΜΕΙΣ behind

According to the usual Greek version, Marsyas found the aulos (double pipe) that the goddess Athena had invented and thrown away and, after becoming skilled in playing it, challenged Apollo to a contest with his lyre. There are several versions of the contest; according to Hyginus, Marsyas was departing as victor after the first round, when Apollo, turning his lyre upside down, played the same tune. This was something that Marsyas could not do with his flute. According to Diodorus Siculus, Marsyas was defeated when Apollo added his voice to the sound of the lyre. Marsyas protested, arguing that the skill with the instrument was to be compared, not the voice. However, Apollo replied that when Marsyas blew into the pipes, he was doing almost the same thing himself. The Nysean nymphs supported Apollo′s claim, leading to his victory. Marsyas was tied to a tree and flayed him. His skin was displayed at Calaenae in southern Phrygia, as the Greek historians Herodotus and Xenophon report.

BMC 147 ; SNG.Copenhagen 208 ; SNG.von Aulock 3490 ;
RPC.3137 ; Waddington 5707 ; Lindgren collection 901 ;
SNG.München 150 ; Sear GIC.598

Minor traces of oxidation.
vf-

165,00 



NERO, 54-68 - SYRIA, ANTIOCHIA AD ORONTEM - AR Tetradrachm, jr.10/112 (63/64 AD)

weight 15,01gr. ; billon Ø 24mm.

obv. Laureate head of Nero right, with aegis, surrounded by the legend;
ΝΕΡΩΝ ΚΑΙΣΑΡ ΣΕΒΑΣΤΟΣ
rev. Eagle on thunderboltstanding right; to right palm branch,
ΕΤΟΥΣ in exergue, BIP I to left

BMC 198 ; cf. Wruck 47 ; Prieur 89; cf. McAlee 264 ; RPC.4189
Very attractive piece with light toning.
vf/xf

650,00 



NERO, 54-68 AD - SYRIA, ANTIOCHIA AD ORONTEM - AE 18, circa 54-60 AD

weight 8,45gr. ; bronze Ø 18mm.

obv. Laureate head of Nero right, surrounded by legend;
IMP NER CL AV GER
rev. S C within laurel-wreath

BMC- ; SNG.von Aulock- ; SNG.Copenhagen- (cf. 161) ; 
cf.Wruck 50 ; RPC.4283A (1 specimen)
RRR
Short thick flan. Dark patina. Extremely rare.
Minor traces of oxidation.
f/vf à vf

195,00 



NERO, 54-68 - EGYPTE, ALEXANDRIA - AE Diobol, jr.14 (67-68 AD)

weight 13,49gr. ; billon Ø 25mm.

obv. Laureate head of Nero right  NEPΩ KΛAY KAIΣ ΣEB ΓEP AY
rev. Ritual vase (oinochoe), L - ID across field

cf. BMC 188 ; Milne- ; SNG.Copenhagen - ; Dattari- (cf. 286) ; Dattari -Savio pl.1, 2 ; 
Emmett 153.14 ; RPC.5322 (3 ex.) ; SNG.Köln 211 ; SNG.Paris- ; Sear 2028
RRR
Only a few pieces are known from this coin type. Extremely rare.
vf-

850,00 





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